2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160590
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comfort Management of End-of-Life and Chronically Ill Patients
Abstract:
Comfort Management of End-of-Life and Chronically Ill Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Killeen, Mary, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan-Flint
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 516 French Hall, 303 East Kearsley Street, Flint, MI, 48502-2186, USA
Contact Telephone:810.762.3420
Purpose. A social systems perspective, based on King's (1981) Interacting Systems Framework was the conceptual basis for this comfort management pilot study. The purpose was to: 1) describe comfort management interventions, 2) field-test a patient satisfaction with comfort management instrument, 3) test three Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOCs) (McCloskey & Bulechek, 2000) (pain level, comfort level, and quality of life) for their use as clinical tools, and 4) describe patient/family costs associated with comfort management. Sample. The pilot study's final sample will include a minimum of 60 chronically ill and end-of-life adult patients with chronic or cancer pain from two Home care/Hospice agencies located in a Midwestern U.S. state. Method. Three consecutive weekly interviews were conducted in the home setting. A study packet consisting of a demographic form, expense diary, the five outcome instruments (pain level, comfort level, quality of life, patient satisfaction with comfort management, cost of care) and the criterion tools was developed. The criterion tools include a Numeric Rating Scale for pain: a Visual Analogue Scale for Total Comfort (Kolcaba & Steiner, 2000); the Quality of Life Index (Ferrans & Powers, 1992) for chronically ill patients and the Missoula-VITAS(r) (Byrock & Merriman, 1998) for hospice patients. Content validity of the Patient Satisfaction with Comfort Management tool (Killeen, 1996) was estimated with 10 subjects in a pre pilot phase. Analysis. Descriptive statistics will be used to summarize the final data. Psychometric techniques will be used to estimate the reliability and validity of the instruments. Chart data and the expense diary information will be summarized to describe the comfort interventions and comfort costs. Implications. The pilot study results will be used to conduct a quasi-experimental study on the impact of comfort management on patient outcomes among chronically ill and end-of-life patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComfort Management of End-of-Life and Chronically Ill Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160590-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comfort Management of End-of-Life and Chronically Ill Patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Killeen, Mary, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan-Flint</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 516 French Hall, 303 East Kearsley Street, Flint, MI, 48502-2186, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">810.762.3420</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkilleen@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose. A social systems perspective, based on King's (1981) Interacting Systems Framework was the conceptual basis for this comfort management pilot study. The purpose was to: 1) describe comfort management interventions, 2) field-test a patient satisfaction with comfort management instrument, 3) test three Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOCs) (McCloskey &amp; Bulechek, 2000) (pain level, comfort level, and quality of life) for their use as clinical tools, and 4) describe patient/family costs associated with comfort management. Sample. The pilot study's final sample will include a minimum of 60 chronically ill and end-of-life adult patients with chronic or cancer pain from two Home care/Hospice agencies located in a Midwestern U.S. state. Method. Three consecutive weekly interviews were conducted in the home setting. A study packet consisting of a demographic form, expense diary, the five outcome instruments (pain level, comfort level, quality of life, patient satisfaction with comfort management, cost of care) and the criterion tools was developed. The criterion tools include a Numeric Rating Scale for pain: a Visual Analogue Scale for Total Comfort (Kolcaba &amp; Steiner, 2000); the Quality of Life Index (Ferrans &amp; Powers, 1992) for chronically ill patients and the Missoula-VITAS(r) (Byrock &amp; Merriman, 1998) for hospice patients. Content validity of the Patient Satisfaction with Comfort Management tool (Killeen, 1996) was estimated with 10 subjects in a pre pilot phase. Analysis. Descriptive statistics will be used to summarize the final data. Psychometric techniques will be used to estimate the reliability and validity of the instruments. Chart data and the expense diary information will be summarized to describe the comfort interventions and comfort costs. Implications. The pilot study results will be used to conduct a quasi-experimental study on the impact of comfort management on patient outcomes among chronically ill and end-of-life patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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