2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160592
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fatigue-Related Self-Care
Abstract:
Fatigue-Related Self-Care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Magnan, Morris
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 326 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
To achieve a full understanding of self-care, it must be studied in individuals with well-delineated self-care requirements. The purpose of this study was to describe the content and perceived effectiveness of the self-care systems used by radiation therapy patients to manage the experience of cancer-related fatigue. Orem's conceptualization of the substantive structure of self-care guided the inquiry. A self-care management interview was used to record behaviors of 374 fatigued radiation therapy subjects participating in a larger federally funded, clinical trial of nursing interventions. Discrete behaviors were classified as restorative, energy conserving, energy expending, and other with classification validated by interrater agreement (Kappa=.84). Subjects reported a total of 620 behaviors. From 1 to 9 behaviors were used by individual subjects, M=2.77, SD=1.54. Three or fewer behaviors were used by 275 (73.5%). On a 5-point scale (5=severe), behaviors were self-rated as moderately effective in relieving fatigue (M=3.81, SD=.99). Subjects used from 1 to 4 methods to manage fatigue, but more than half (n=195; 52%) used one method exclusively. The method used by the greatest percentage of patients (n=291; 77.8%) was energy conservation even though it was ranked as the third most effective method (M=3.79, SD=1.01). The most effective method was the restorative method (M=3.92, SD=.99), but it was used by only 210 (56.1%) of the subjects. Findings demonstrated that collectively, patients report a wide variety of behaviors but individually use a small number of behaviors to manage their experience of cancer-related fatigue. Behaviors and methods used most frequently were not always the most effective.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFatigue-Related Self-Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160592-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fatigue-Related Self-Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Magnan, Morris</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 326 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mamagnan@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To achieve a full understanding of self-care, it must be studied in individuals with well-delineated self-care requirements. The purpose of this study was to describe the content and perceived effectiveness of the self-care systems used by radiation therapy patients to manage the experience of cancer-related fatigue. Orem's conceptualization of the substantive structure of self-care guided the inquiry. A self-care management interview was used to record behaviors of 374 fatigued radiation therapy subjects participating in a larger federally funded, clinical trial of nursing interventions. Discrete behaviors were classified as restorative, energy conserving, energy expending, and other with classification validated by interrater agreement (Kappa=.84). Subjects reported a total of 620 behaviors. From 1 to 9 behaviors were used by individual subjects, M=2.77, SD=1.54. Three or fewer behaviors were used by 275 (73.5%). On a 5-point scale (5=severe), behaviors were self-rated as moderately effective in relieving fatigue (M=3.81, SD=.99). Subjects used from 1 to 4 methods to manage fatigue, but more than half (n=195; 52%) used one method exclusively. The method used by the greatest percentage of patients (n=291; 77.8%) was energy conservation even though it was ranked as the third most effective method (M=3.79, SD=1.01). The most effective method was the restorative method (M=3.92, SD=.99), but it was used by only 210 (56.1%) of the subjects. Findings demonstrated that collectively, patients report a wide variety of behaviors but individually use a small number of behaviors to manage their experience of cancer-related fatigue. Behaviors and methods used most frequently were not always the most effective.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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