2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160593
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interpersonal Model of Depression for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities
Abstract:
Interpersonal Model of Depression for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Ailey, Sarah
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Depression is one of the most common psychiatric problems for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and is associated with decreased social support, social skills deficits, and aggressive behavior. The ability of individuals with intellectual disabilities to integrate into community and workplace settings may be hampered by depression. Knowledge regarding causes and treatment of depression with this population is limited. Research is hampered by a lack of appropriate theoretical models, uniform criteria to assess depression, and appropriate instruments to measure depression. The purpose of the study is to 1). assess the reliability and validity of scores on instruments measuring depression, loneliness, and life satisfaction, and 2). test the relationship of the variables in an interpersonal model of depression based on the Theory of Human Relatedness, a theory developed in psychiatric nursing that addresses the interaction of human relatedness and psychiatric disorders. The study uses a secondary analysis of data from the "Exercise Adherence Study among adults with Down Syndrome/mental retardation." The sample includes 108 adults with intellectual disabilities, age 30-80, with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities. Rasch psychometric methods are used in a descriptive and correlational design. Reliability is assessed using Rasch separation statistics. Content and construct validity are evaluated by assessing item order and item fit. After converting to Rasch logit measures, the association of depression, loneliness and life satisfaction are assessed. Implications for using the Theory of Human Relatedness to develop theoretical models and potential treatments for depression with adults with intellectual disabilities are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInterpersonal Model of Depression for Adults with Intellectual Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160593-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interpersonal Model of Depression for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ailey, Sarah</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Depression is one of the most common psychiatric problems for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and is associated with decreased social support, social skills deficits, and aggressive behavior. The ability of individuals with intellectual disabilities to integrate into community and workplace settings may be hampered by depression. Knowledge regarding causes and treatment of depression with this population is limited. Research is hampered by a lack of appropriate theoretical models, uniform criteria to assess depression, and appropriate instruments to measure depression. The purpose of the study is to 1). assess the reliability and validity of scores on instruments measuring depression, loneliness, and life satisfaction, and 2). test the relationship of the variables in an interpersonal model of depression based on the Theory of Human Relatedness, a theory developed in psychiatric nursing that addresses the interaction of human relatedness and psychiatric disorders. The study uses a secondary analysis of data from the &quot;Exercise Adherence Study among adults with Down Syndrome/mental retardation.&quot; The sample includes 108 adults with intellectual disabilities, age 30-80, with mild and moderate intellectual disabilities. Rasch psychometric methods are used in a descriptive and correlational design. Reliability is assessed using Rasch separation statistics. Content and construct validity are evaluated by assessing item order and item fit. After converting to Rasch logit measures, the association of depression, loneliness and life satisfaction are assessed. Implications for using the Theory of Human Relatedness to develop theoretical models and potential treatments for depression with adults with intellectual disabilities are discussed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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