2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160594
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mental Status and Quality of Life in Heart Failure
Abstract:
Mental Status and Quality of Life in Heart Failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hou, Nan
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 132, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) report cognitive dysfunction and changes in mental status as problems that impair their quality of life (QoL), yet limited attention has been given to the factors associated with this dysfunction in HF. Purpose: The purpose of this longitudinal study was to: 1) examine correlates of mental status (a component of cognitive function) - demographics, clinical factors, and QoL - among HF patients at baseline and 2) examine associations between baseline mental status and changes in QoL over 26 weeks. Methods: As part of a larger study to compare measures of QoL, patients were recruited from two outpatient clinics and were interviewed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 26 weeks after baseline. Mental status was measured by the Pfeiffer Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ). QoL was measured by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (LHFQ) and the Chronic Heart Failure Questionnaire (CHQ). Results: The convenience sample included 211 patients at baseline (49% women; 61% African Americans; age 22 to 90 years; and NYHA Class I-14%, II-39%, III-39%, and IV-8%); 146 completed the study. At baseline, older, less educated, non-white, and women patients had significantly lower mental status scores on the SPMSQ. No relationships were found between the SPMSQ and baseline QoL scores. Higher baseline SPMSQ scores were associated with greater changes in LHFQ emotional scores over 26 weeks, indicating worsening QoL over time. Conclusions: Mental status was primarily related to demographic data. Patients with relatively better cognitive function may be more perceptive of their poor emotional QoL. Further studies need to 1) use more sensitive measures of cognitive function to understand the full range of cognitive deficits and 2) explore strategies patients use to deal with self-reported cognitive deficits.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMental Status and Quality of Life in Heart Failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160594-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Mental Status and Quality of Life in Heart Failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hou, Nan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 132, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nhou@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) report cognitive dysfunction and changes in mental status as problems that impair their quality of life (QoL), yet limited attention has been given to the factors associated with this dysfunction in HF. Purpose: The purpose of this longitudinal study was to: 1) examine correlates of mental status (a component of cognitive function) - demographics, clinical factors, and QoL - among HF patients at baseline and 2) examine associations between baseline mental status and changes in QoL over 26 weeks. Methods: As part of a larger study to compare measures of QoL, patients were recruited from two outpatient clinics and were interviewed at baseline and at 4, 8, and 26 weeks after baseline. Mental status was measured by the Pfeiffer Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ). QoL was measured by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (LHFQ) and the Chronic Heart Failure Questionnaire (CHQ). Results: The convenience sample included 211 patients at baseline (49% women; 61% African Americans; age 22 to 90 years; and NYHA Class I-14%, II-39%, III-39%, and IV-8%); 146 completed the study. At baseline, older, less educated, non-white, and women patients had significantly lower mental status scores on the SPMSQ. No relationships were found between the SPMSQ and baseline QoL scores. Higher baseline SPMSQ scores were associated with greater changes in LHFQ emotional scores over 26 weeks, indicating worsening QoL over time. Conclusions: Mental status was primarily related to demographic data. Patients with relatively better cognitive function may be more perceptive of their poor emotional QoL. Further studies need to 1) use more sensitive measures of cognitive function to understand the full range of cognitive deficits and 2) explore strategies patients use to deal with self-reported cognitive deficits.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.