2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160597
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oldest-Old Adults' Interactions with Care Providers in Rural Health Clinics
Abstract:
Oldest-Old Adults' Interactions with Care Providers in Rural Health Clinics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Hinck, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:417.886.4929
Nineteen oldest-old adults (13 women, all White, mean age 91.4 years, range 85-98 years) who lived alone in their own homes in nine rural counties of Southwest Missouri were interviewed at least three times to learn about their everyday lived experiences. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed using an interpretive tradition. During discussions about day-to-day activities, participants described their interactions with nurses and physicians in rural ambulatory clinics. Although participants identified physicians by name, nurses were rarely mentioned and referred to only as the office nurses. When discussing physicians, participants told how relationships had changed in recent years due to accessibility. Participants no longer had the consistent hometown physician who practiced for decades in the same rural area and was available at all times. Now many rural physicians were transient employees of satellite clinics of urban medical centers. Three main problems participants identified with continuity in medical care were (1) physicians work at the clinics for only a few years, (2) participants may be seen by substituting physicians rather than the physicians with whom they have appointments, and (3) clinics have limited office hours. Participants say they value physicians' advice but have little loyalty to any one physician and view physicians as interchangeable. Therefore, participants described a fragmented system of medical care where they used different physicians and clinics for treatment of acute and chronic illnesses and hospital emergency departments after office hours. Understanding the meanings of provider interactions for rural residents is valuable to policy-makers and direct providers who wish to offer seamless comprehensive care. Understanding oldest-old adults' needs uncovers opportunities for nurses in rural settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOldest-Old Adults' Interactions with Care Providers in Rural Health Clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160597-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Oldest-Old Adults' Interactions with Care Providers in Rural Health Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hinck, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">417.886.4929</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shspfd@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nineteen oldest-old adults (13 women, all White, mean age 91.4 years, range 85-98 years) who lived alone in their own homes in nine rural counties of Southwest Missouri were interviewed at least three times to learn about their everyday lived experiences. Interviews were audio taped, transcribed, and analyzed using an interpretive tradition. During discussions about day-to-day activities, participants described their interactions with nurses and physicians in rural ambulatory clinics. Although participants identified physicians by name, nurses were rarely mentioned and referred to only as the office nurses. When discussing physicians, participants told how relationships had changed in recent years due to accessibility. Participants no longer had the consistent hometown physician who practiced for decades in the same rural area and was available at all times. Now many rural physicians were transient employees of satellite clinics of urban medical centers. Three main problems participants identified with continuity in medical care were (1) physicians work at the clinics for only a few years, (2) participants may be seen by substituting physicians rather than the physicians with whom they have appointments, and (3) clinics have limited office hours. Participants say they value physicians' advice but have little loyalty to any one physician and view physicians as interchangeable. Therefore, participants described a fragmented system of medical care where they used different physicians and clinics for treatment of acute and chronic illnesses and hospital emergency departments after office hours. Understanding the meanings of provider interactions for rural residents is valuable to policy-makers and direct providers who wish to offer seamless comprehensive care. Understanding oldest-old adults' needs uncovers opportunities for nurses in rural settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:05:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:05:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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