Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program Completion and Pulmonary Support Group Membership: Differences in Perceptions of Self-Efficacy, Dyspnea, and Functional Performance

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160601
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program Completion and Pulmonary Support Group Membership: Differences in Perceptions of Self-Efficacy, Dyspnea, and Functional Performance
Abstract:
Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program Completion and Pulmonary Support Group Membership: Differences in Perceptions of Self-Efficacy, Dyspnea, and Functional Performance
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Siela, Debra
P.I. Institution Name:Ball State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2000 University Avenue, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA
Contact Telephone:765.285.5658
People with COPD and dyspnea must learn to manage dyspnea for increased functional performance. Self-efficacy is the amount of confidence with which one can perform a specific behavior in a specific situation as postulated by Bandura (1986). High self-efficacy implies the high confidence that people with COPD have in their capabilities to manage dyspnea. The purpose of the study was to examine the differences in self-efficacy, dyspnea, and functional performance in those people completing and not completing a pulmonary rehabilitation program and in those people who were members and not members of a pulmonary patient support group. The sample of 52 men and 45 women with COPD completed questionnaires using the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale, Pulmonary Functional Status and Dyspnea Questionnaire, Functional Performance Inventory, and demographic information. Criteria for study inclusion included a FEV1 of less than 70 percent predicted and a FEV1/FVC of less than 70 percent. Results revealed significant differences in functional performance perceptions in those completing a pulmonary rehabilitation program versus those who did not complete a pulmonary rehabilitation program. In addition, perceptions of self-efficacy were significantly different between pulmonary rehabilitation and non-pulmonary rehabilitation groups as well as support group members and non-members of support groups. No significant differences occurred between groups in overall dyspnea. Both functional performance and self-efficacy were perceived to be less in those people who completed pulmonary rehabilitation and who were members of a pulmonary support group. Conclusions are that people with COPD need to be directed to both pulmonary rehabilitation and patient support groups much earlier in the progression of their disease process in order to maintain or improve their optimal level of self-efficacy in managing dyspnea and functional performance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePulmonary Rehabilitation Program Completion and Pulmonary Support Group Membership: Differences in Perceptions of Self-Efficacy, Dyspnea, and Functional Performanceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160601-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program Completion and Pulmonary Support Group Membership: Differences in Perceptions of Self-Efficacy, Dyspnea, and Functional Performance</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Siela, Debra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ball State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2000 University Avenue, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">765.285.5658</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dsiela@bsu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">People with COPD and dyspnea must learn to manage dyspnea for increased functional performance. Self-efficacy is the amount of confidence with which one can perform a specific behavior in a specific situation as postulated by Bandura (1986). High self-efficacy implies the high confidence that people with COPD have in their capabilities to manage dyspnea. The purpose of the study was to examine the differences in self-efficacy, dyspnea, and functional performance in those people completing and not completing a pulmonary rehabilitation program and in those people who were members and not members of a pulmonary patient support group. The sample of 52 men and 45 women with COPD completed questionnaires using the COPD Self-Efficacy Scale, Pulmonary Functional Status and Dyspnea Questionnaire, Functional Performance Inventory, and demographic information. Criteria for study inclusion included a FEV1 of less than 70 percent predicted and a FEV1/FVC of less than 70 percent. Results revealed significant differences in functional performance perceptions in those completing a pulmonary rehabilitation program versus those who did not complete a pulmonary rehabilitation program. In addition, perceptions of self-efficacy were significantly different between pulmonary rehabilitation and non-pulmonary rehabilitation groups as well as support group members and non-members of support groups. No significant differences occurred between groups in overall dyspnea. Both functional performance and self-efficacy were perceived to be less in those people who completed pulmonary rehabilitation and who were members of a pulmonary support group. Conclusions are that people with COPD need to be directed to both pulmonary rehabilitation and patient support groups much earlier in the progression of their disease process in order to maintain or improve their optimal level of self-efficacy in managing dyspnea and functional performance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:06:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:06:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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