Senior Healthways: Programs for Promoting Resourcefulness in Elders with Chronic Conditions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160604
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Senior Healthways: Programs for Promoting Resourcefulness in Elders with Chronic Conditions
Abstract:
Senior Healthways: Programs for Promoting Resourcefulness in Elders with Chronic Conditions
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.3612
Aging increases vulnerability to chronic illness, and approximately 80% of elders have at least one chronic condition that limits performance of daily activities and affects psychological and physical functioning. Impaired functional ability often precipitates relocation to retirement communities (RCs) that provide assistance with daily tasks. Yet, self-management of chronic conditions involves using both internal and external resources to attain, maintain, or regain health. Resourcefulness involves using personal resources to perform daily tasks independently and social resources to seek help from others when unable to function independently. Elders who are resourceful both personally and socially have demonstrated healthier functioning than those using personal or social resources alone. Elders with more chronic conditions have greater improvements in functional status after being taught resourcefulness skills than those with fewer chronic conditions. An ongoing clinical trial is testing the separate and combined effects of personal and social resourcefulness training (PRT and SRT) to 240 elders in 20 randomly selected RCs. A diversional group (DIV) will determine content specificity of the interventions and a reminiscence group (REM) will separate effects of reminiscence that may occur during PRT, SRT, or PRT+SRT. The RCs are randomly assigned to PRT, SRT, PRT+SRT, REM, or DIV and 10-12 residents in each RC participate in group intervention sessions led by trained nurse clinicians and individual interviews pre- and post-intervention. A priori planned comparisons will compare: PRT, SRT, and PRT+SRT to DIV and REM; PRT+SRT combined to PRT and SRT alone; and PRT to SRT. The comparisons will be repeated while controlling for demographics and chronic conditions to determine if the effects still hold. Treatment effects will be examined for immediate, 6-week lagged, and 3-month extended effects. This study is unique in comparing the separate and additive effects of PRT and SRT on indicators of physical and psychological health in elders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSenior Healthways: Programs for Promoting Resourcefulness in Elders with Chronic Conditionsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160604-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Senior Healthways: Programs for Promoting Resourcefulness in Elders with Chronic Conditions</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.3612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Aging increases vulnerability to chronic illness, and approximately 80% of elders have at least one chronic condition that limits performance of daily activities and affects psychological and physical functioning. Impaired functional ability often precipitates relocation to retirement communities (RCs) that provide assistance with daily tasks. Yet, self-management of chronic conditions involves using both internal and external resources to attain, maintain, or regain health. Resourcefulness involves using personal resources to perform daily tasks independently and social resources to seek help from others when unable to function independently. Elders who are resourceful both personally and socially have demonstrated healthier functioning than those using personal or social resources alone. Elders with more chronic conditions have greater improvements in functional status after being taught resourcefulness skills than those with fewer chronic conditions. An ongoing clinical trial is testing the separate and combined effects of personal and social resourcefulness training (PRT and SRT) to 240 elders in 20 randomly selected RCs. A diversional group (DIV) will determine content specificity of the interventions and a reminiscence group (REM) will separate effects of reminiscence that may occur during PRT, SRT, or PRT+SRT. The RCs are randomly assigned to PRT, SRT, PRT+SRT, REM, or DIV and 10-12 residents in each RC participate in group intervention sessions led by trained nurse clinicians and individual interviews pre- and post-intervention. A priori planned comparisons will compare: PRT, SRT, and PRT+SRT to DIV and REM; PRT+SRT combined to PRT and SRT alone; and PRT to SRT. The comparisons will be repeated while controlling for demographics and chronic conditions to determine if the effects still hold. Treatment effects will be examined for immediate, 6-week lagged, and 3-month extended effects. This study is unique in comparing the separate and additive effects of PRT and SRT on indicators of physical and psychological health in elders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:06:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:06:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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