2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160611
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescents' Experiences of Childbirth: Contrasts to Adults
Abstract:
Adolescents' Experiences of Childbirth: Contrasts to Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Low, Lisa
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0334
Thirteen percent of the births in the United States are to adolescents, yet most research about the experience of childbirth has been conducted with Euro American, married, middle class, adult women. To better understand adolescents' experiences of childbirth, a qualitative investigation was conducted using a developmental conceptual framework. The specific aims were to describe how the experience of childbirth differs for adolescents as compared to adults, based on current research and 2) to identify care practices during childbirth that promote a positive experience of childbirth for adolescents. Twenty-five ethnically diverse adolescents between 13-18 years old were interviewed regarding their birth experiences. Interviews occurred within one week to 36 months after their first birth experience. A semi-structured face to face or phone interview was conducted. Extended case methodology was used which includes a process of interpretive analysis of the birth stories. Key findings demonstrated differences between the adolescents in this study and the current state of the science regarding the experience of childbirth. Differences included the themes that were emphasized, how the birth story was told and specific care practices that were perceived as positive, negative or painful. Adolescents were concerned about their relationship with health care providers, which appeared strained by the social context of being pregnant at a young age. Negative interactions with care providers created experiences of frustration and shame by the adolescents. Findings from this investigation indicate a need to define new relationships with health care providers that are based on a process of information sharing, listening with respect, instead of "assuming the worst" and "being there" providing comfort during the childbirth experience. A new model of care is proposed that combines the adolescents' requests to be treated like adults while also considering the dual developmental crises of adolescence combined with parenthood.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescents' Experiences of Childbirth: Contrasts to Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160611-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescents' Experiences of Childbirth: Contrasts to Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Low, Lisa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0334</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kanelow@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Thirteen percent of the births in the United States are to adolescents, yet most research about the experience of childbirth has been conducted with Euro American, married, middle class, adult women. To better understand adolescents' experiences of childbirth, a qualitative investigation was conducted using a developmental conceptual framework. The specific aims were to describe how the experience of childbirth differs for adolescents as compared to adults, based on current research and 2) to identify care practices during childbirth that promote a positive experience of childbirth for adolescents. Twenty-five ethnically diverse adolescents between 13-18 years old were interviewed regarding their birth experiences. Interviews occurred within one week to 36 months after their first birth experience. A semi-structured face to face or phone interview was conducted. Extended case methodology was used which includes a process of interpretive analysis of the birth stories. Key findings demonstrated differences between the adolescents in this study and the current state of the science regarding the experience of childbirth. Differences included the themes that were emphasized, how the birth story was told and specific care practices that were perceived as positive, negative or painful. Adolescents were concerned about their relationship with health care providers, which appeared strained by the social context of being pregnant at a young age. Negative interactions with care providers created experiences of frustration and shame by the adolescents. Findings from this investigation indicate a need to define new relationships with health care providers that are based on a process of information sharing, listening with respect, instead of &quot;assuming the worst&quot; and &quot;being there&quot; providing comfort during the childbirth experience. A new model of care is proposed that combines the adolescents' requests to be treated like adults while also considering the dual developmental crises of adolescence combined with parenthood.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:06:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:06:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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