2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160613
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding Experiences of Adolescent Mothers
Abstract:
Breastfeeding Experiences of Adolescent Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Wambach, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913.588.1639
Purpose: the purpose of this study is to describe the breastfeeding experiences of adolescent mothers in terms of positive and negative breastfeeding events and barriers and facilitators (personal and social) to successful breastfeeding. Theoretical Framework: Extant literature in relation to breastfeeding practices and experiences of adolescent mothers is limited. Descriptive data gathered through qualitative methods is needed to provide a broader and deeper knowledge base, especially with regard to disadvantaged and minority adolescent mothers' experiences. The Theory of Planned Behavior is the basis for a larger proposed intervention study to which this data will be applied to the planned interventions. Sample: English-speaking adolescent mothers, currently breastfeeding or who have breastfed their infants for at least 3 postpartum days within the past 6 months, aged 13-18, from two large teaching hospitals are being invited to participate in this study. Method: Focus groups and some follow-up individual semi-structured interviews are being used to conduct the research. Principles of analyzing focus group results as outlined by Kruger and Casey and incorporating constant comparative analysis techniques are being used. Transcript based analysis in which verbatim interview text, field notes, and debriefing notes are being analyzed using principles of axial coding, development of categories, and themes in the data. Recognized methods of ensuring trustworthiness and credibility of the data are being employed. Preliminary Results: Based on two focus groups, adolescent mothers experience breastfeeding in both positive and negative ways. Teens report that emotional and physical closeness to their infants gained through breastfeeding is a significant advantage, as well as the ease and convenience of breastfeeding. Social demands of work and school present barriers to exclusive breastfeeding. Family members, especially grandmothers of the infants, are seen as significant supporters of continued breastfeeding. Conclusions are pending the final data collection and analysis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding Experiences of Adolescent Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160613-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breastfeeding Experiences of Adolescent Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wambach, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913.588.1639</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kwambach@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: the purpose of this study is to describe the breastfeeding experiences of adolescent mothers in terms of positive and negative breastfeeding events and barriers and facilitators (personal and social) to successful breastfeeding. Theoretical Framework: Extant literature in relation to breastfeeding practices and experiences of adolescent mothers is limited. Descriptive data gathered through qualitative methods is needed to provide a broader and deeper knowledge base, especially with regard to disadvantaged and minority adolescent mothers' experiences. The Theory of Planned Behavior is the basis for a larger proposed intervention study to which this data will be applied to the planned interventions. Sample: English-speaking adolescent mothers, currently breastfeeding or who have breastfed their infants for at least 3 postpartum days within the past 6 months, aged 13-18, from two large teaching hospitals are being invited to participate in this study. Method: Focus groups and some follow-up individual semi-structured interviews are being used to conduct the research. Principles of analyzing focus group results as outlined by Kruger and Casey and incorporating constant comparative analysis techniques are being used. Transcript based analysis in which verbatim interview text, field notes, and debriefing notes are being analyzed using principles of axial coding, development of categories, and themes in the data. Recognized methods of ensuring trustworthiness and credibility of the data are being employed. Preliminary Results: Based on two focus groups, adolescent mothers experience breastfeeding in both positive and negative ways. Teens report that emotional and physical closeness to their infants gained through breastfeeding is a significant advantage, as well as the ease and convenience of breastfeeding. Social demands of work and school present barriers to exclusive breastfeeding. Family members, especially grandmothers of the infants, are seen as significant supporters of continued breastfeeding. Conclusions are pending the final data collection and analysis.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:06:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:06:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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