2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160616
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Poison Exposure Data: Nhis Survey and Tess
Abstract:
Comparison of Poison Exposure Data: Nhis Survey and Tess
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Polivka, Barbara, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, 320 Newton Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614.292.4902
Objective: To identify age-adjusted poisoning rates, poison control center (PCC) contacts, and hospitalizations due to poisonings in young children based on 1997 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data; and compare findings with 1997 Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) data. Methods: Secondary analysis of NHIS poisoning episode data for children 5 years and younger. Data were collected originally via in-person interviews with 103,477 persons from 39,832 randomly selected households. Respondents were asked about poison exposures during the previous 3 months. Results: Based on NHIS population weighted data, annual poisoning rates were highest in children 1-2 years old, and more poisonings resulted from non-pharmaceutical substances. A PCC was called in most exposures to children <3 years, but only in about half of the 4-5 year old exposures. In 54% of the poisoning hospitalizations a PCC was called. The odds of a child being hospitalized for poisoning were 3.75 times greater when the PCC was not called, compared to 0.27 when the PCC was called. Comparison of NHIS data with data in the 1997 Annual Report of the TESS revealed the number of NHIS reported exposures were approximately 1/2 those in the TESS data. In both datasets, children in the 1-2 year age group had the highest percent of poisoning exposures. Review of TESS data revealed boys and girls had approximately equal exposures; girls had a higher percentage of poisonings in the NHIS data at 1,2 and 4 years of age. Conclusions: Based on NHIS data, hospitalizations are diverted when the PCC is called. Differences in number of pediatric exposures and the predominance of exposures to girls may reflect recall bias in the NHIS data. Differences in data elements collected by NHIS and by TESS make comparisons difficult. Efforts should be made to standardize types of data collected.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Poison Exposure Data: Nhis Survey and Tessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160616-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Poison Exposure Data: Nhis Survey and Tess</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Polivka, Barbara, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, 320 Newton Hall, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614.292.4902</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">polivka.1@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To identify age-adjusted poisoning rates, poison control center (PCC) contacts, and hospitalizations due to poisonings in young children based on 1997 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data; and compare findings with 1997 Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) data. Methods: Secondary analysis of NHIS poisoning episode data for children 5 years and younger. Data were collected originally via in-person interviews with 103,477 persons from 39,832 randomly selected households. Respondents were asked about poison exposures during the previous 3 months. Results: Based on NHIS population weighted data, annual poisoning rates were highest in children 1-2 years old, and more poisonings resulted from non-pharmaceutical substances. A PCC was called in most exposures to children &lt;3 years, but only in about half of the 4-5 year old exposures. In 54% of the poisoning hospitalizations a PCC was called. The odds of a child being hospitalized for poisoning were 3.75 times greater when the PCC was not called, compared to 0.27 when the PCC was called. Comparison of NHIS data with data in the 1997 Annual Report of the TESS revealed the number of NHIS reported exposures were approximately 1/2 those in the TESS data. In both datasets, children in the 1-2 year age group had the highest percent of poisoning exposures. Review of TESS data revealed boys and girls had approximately equal exposures; girls had a higher percentage of poisonings in the NHIS data at 1,2 and 4 years of age. Conclusions: Based on NHIS data, hospitalizations are diverted when the PCC is called. Differences in number of pediatric exposures and the predominance of exposures to girls may reflect recall bias in the NHIS data. Differences in data elements collected by NHIS and by TESS make comparisons difficult. Efforts should be made to standardize types of data collected.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:06:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:06:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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