2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160617
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Thinking among Community-Dwelling Adults
Abstract:
Critical Thinking among Community-Dwelling Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Settersten, Lori, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 573, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.5461
Critical thinking skills are used daily by adults for practical life decisions in work as well as leisure activities. Critical thinking involves the use of cognitive skills which include recognizing that an issue exists, analyzing and evaluating information related to the issue, considering alternatives, and drawing conclusions as well as explaining rationale for the conclusions. However, critical thinking rarely has been studied among community-dwelling adults. Because interventions to promote critical thinking among students have been effective overall, interventions to promote critical thinking among community-dwelling adults could be designed and tested to promote more effective, positive practical life decisions. The aims of this study are to: 1) examine critical thinking skills among community-dwelling adults, and 2) examine whether these critical thinking skills differ by perceived health status, gender, age, and educational level. A sample of 220 community-dwelling adults aged 18 and over will be recruited from non-health related groups or organizations in a large, Midwestern, metropolitan community. Participants will complete self-report questionnaires, including the Test of Everyday Reasoning (Facione, 1991). Critical thinking total and mean scores will be computed. Bivariate correlations and t-tests will be conducted. Understanding critical thinking among community-dwelling adults could help researchers design more effective decision-making interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Thinking among Community-Dwelling Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160617-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Critical Thinking among Community-Dwelling Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Settersten, Lori, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 573, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.5461</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lorisett@uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Critical thinking skills are used daily by adults for practical life decisions in work as well as leisure activities. Critical thinking involves the use of cognitive skills which include recognizing that an issue exists, analyzing and evaluating information related to the issue, considering alternatives, and drawing conclusions as well as explaining rationale for the conclusions. However, critical thinking rarely has been studied among community-dwelling adults. Because interventions to promote critical thinking among students have been effective overall, interventions to promote critical thinking among community-dwelling adults could be designed and tested to promote more effective, positive practical life decisions. The aims of this study are to: 1) examine critical thinking skills among community-dwelling adults, and 2) examine whether these critical thinking skills differ by perceived health status, gender, age, and educational level. A sample of 220 community-dwelling adults aged 18 and over will be recruited from non-health related groups or organizations in a large, Midwestern, metropolitan community. Participants will complete self-report questionnaires, including the Test of Everyday Reasoning (Facione, 1991). Critical thinking total and mean scores will be computed. Bivariate correlations and t-tests will be conducted. Understanding critical thinking among community-dwelling adults could help researchers design more effective decision-making interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:06:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:06:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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