2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160632
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Asian Seniors Describe Life in a Subsidized Housing Complex
Abstract:
Asian Seniors Describe Life in a Subsidized Housing Complex
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Wang, Ching-eng,
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 767B, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:414.229.5936
Quality of life and health are intimately connected. Health is choosing and living what is personally important based on one's priorities and those of significant others. The purpose of this study was to explore the quality of life for Asian seniors living alone or with their spouse in low-income apartments located in the urban area. The three objectives were to describe the meanings, patterns of relating with others, and hopes, concerns, and plans with respect to quality of life. A qualitative, descriptive exploratory design was used. The nursing perspective in which this study framed is Parse's theory of human becoming. Participants were seven men and four women, between the ages of 70 and 88. Seven of them were immigrants from Taiwan who spoke little English. The researchers used open-ended interviews to gather data with questions derived from the objectives. Preliminary data analysis-synthesis yielded three themes: diverse engagements arising with contentment, delight of close affiliations amid disheartenment and moving on with liberation amid restriction. Implications for nursing practice and future research are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAsian Seniors Describe Life in a Subsidized Housing Complexen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160632-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Asian Seniors Describe Life in a Subsidized Housing Complex</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wang, Ching-eng, </td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 767B, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.229.5936</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cewang@ameritech.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Quality of life and health are intimately connected. Health is choosing and living what is personally important based on one's priorities and those of significant others. The purpose of this study was to explore the quality of life for Asian seniors living alone or with their spouse in low-income apartments located in the urban area. The three objectives were to describe the meanings, patterns of relating with others, and hopes, concerns, and plans with respect to quality of life. A qualitative, descriptive exploratory design was used. The nursing perspective in which this study framed is Parse's theory of human becoming. Participants were seven men and four women, between the ages of 70 and 88. Seven of them were immigrants from Taiwan who spoke little English. The researchers used open-ended interviews to gather data with questions derived from the objectives. Preliminary data analysis-synthesis yielded three themes: diverse engagements arising with contentment, delight of close affiliations amid disheartenment and moving on with liberation amid restriction. Implications for nursing practice and future research are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:07:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:07:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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