2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Support Program for Women using Injection Drugs
Abstract:
A Support Program for Women using Injection Drugs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Roberts, C.
P.I. Institution Name:Queen's University
Title:
Contact Address:K7L 3N6, 90 Barrie St., Kingston, ON, Canada
This paper describes the development of a pre-test, post-test design, demonstration project, conducted by nurse researchers in collaboration with a Canadian street health center. Using the Stages of Change Model and a harm reduction approach, 22 injection drug using women were recruited to participate in a storefront and outreach support program. All are high risk for HIV, 60% are Hepatitis C positive, three are pregnant. Interventions are carried out by a community heath nurse, physician, and peer support worker. Interventions include counseling, home visits, building peer supports and seminars on life skills. Women receive on site health care, child care, meals and transportation. The program is operative in the context of a needle exchange and methadone program. Easy access is provided to over 70 health care and social service organizations. Women are pretested on health, family function, and psychosocial parameters upon acceptance and post-tested after one year of participation. Focus groups at 6 months indicate women feel more in control of their lives, they are better parents, have established supportive relationships with peers and are less fearful of health and social service professionals. Several have entered methadone treatment. All have received counseling, education, health care, and referrals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Support Program for Women using Injection Drugsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Support Program for Women using Injection Drugs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, C.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Queen's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">K7L 3N6, 90 Barrie St., Kingston, ON, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value"> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This paper describes the development of a pre-test, post-test design, demonstration project, conducted by nurse researchers in collaboration with a Canadian street health center. Using the Stages of Change Model and a harm reduction approach, 22 injection drug using women were recruited to participate in a storefront and outreach support program. All are high risk for HIV, 60% are Hepatitis C positive, three are pregnant. Interventions are carried out by a community heath nurse, physician, and peer support worker. Interventions include counseling, home visits, building peer supports and seminars on life skills. Women receive on site health care, child care, meals and transportation. The program is operative in the context of a needle exchange and methadone program. Easy access is provided to over 70 health care and social service organizations. Women are pretested on health, family function, and psychosocial parameters upon acceptance and post-tested after one year of participation. Focus groups at 6 months indicate women feel more in control of their lives, they are better parents, have established supportive relationships with peers and are less fearful of health and social service professionals. Several have entered methadone treatment. All have received counseling, education, health care, and referrals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:07:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:07:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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