2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160636
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Army Medic Training
Abstract:
Improving Army Medic Training
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Abbott, Cyndi
P.I. Institution Name:Army Medical Department Center & School
Contact Address:Center for Health Care Studies, 2250 Stanley Road, Houston, TX, 78234-6100, USA
Contact Telephone:210.221.9514
Teaching and maintaining life-saving skills is critically important and can be challenging when skills are not used on a routine basis. This study examined clinical skill proficiency of Army first responders (medics) performing four life-saving skills and measured the effect a self-directed multi-sensory sustainment package on medics' ability to maintain or improve skill proficiency. Life saving skills examined included: casualty assessment, airway management, shock and bleeding management, and inserting an IV. The retrospective study phase measured skill proficiency of 284 medics with 1-4 years of experience at four Army sites. The prospective phase measured skill proficiency of 127 newly graduated medics, comparing graduates of a traditional 10-week course with graduates of an experimental 10-week course. After a baseline measurement of skill performance and cognitive knowledge, an experimental skill sustainment package was initiated at one site to compare performance of medics using the experimental program with the usual sustainment training at the remaining three installations. Subsequent measures were taken to determine if skill proficiency degraded, remained the same, or improved. Results demonstrated experienced medic skill proficiency was low and a significant effect in clinical skill improvement from the experimental training package could be achieved by experienced medics and new medic graduates.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Army Medic Trainingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160636-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Improving Army Medic Training</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Abbott, Cyndi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Army Medical Department Center &amp; School</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Center for Health Care Studies, 2250 Stanley Road, Houston, TX, 78234-6100, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">210.221.9514</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cynthia.abbott@amedd.army.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Teaching and maintaining life-saving skills is critically important and can be challenging when skills are not used on a routine basis. This study examined clinical skill proficiency of Army first responders (medics) performing four life-saving skills and measured the effect a self-directed multi-sensory sustainment package on medics' ability to maintain or improve skill proficiency. Life saving skills examined included: casualty assessment, airway management, shock and bleeding management, and inserting an IV. The retrospective study phase measured skill proficiency of 284 medics with 1-4 years of experience at four Army sites. The prospective phase measured skill proficiency of 127 newly graduated medics, comparing graduates of a traditional 10-week course with graduates of an experimental 10-week course. After a baseline measurement of skill performance and cognitive knowledge, an experimental skill sustainment package was initiated at one site to compare performance of medics using the experimental program with the usual sustainment training at the remaining three installations. Subsequent measures were taken to determine if skill proficiency degraded, remained the same, or improved. Results demonstrated experienced medic skill proficiency was low and a significant effect in clinical skill improvement from the experimental training package could be achieved by experienced medics and new medic graduates.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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