2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Imposed work of breathing during mechanical ventilator failure
Abstract:
Imposed work of breathing during mechanical ventilator failure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Austin, Paul
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Contact Address:c/o Prof. Lynn Sommers, 405 Procter Hall, PO Box 2, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5268
Mechanical ventilators possess a safety valve allowing spontaneous breathing of ambient air during failure of the ventilator. Patients exhibit a substantial effort to inhale through this valve. The research hypothesis was: The additional work of breathing (WOB) imposed by a mechanical ventilator during ventilator failure is >50% of normal WOB during spontaneous breathing (approximately 500 mJ/L). A modification of Campbell's model, a physiological framework describing work during spontaneous breathing, served as the theoretical framework. We used 9 portable ventilators (PVs) and 8 critical care ventilators (CCVs) as our sample. Ventilators were attached to a test lung to simulate spontaneous breathing with consistent tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow. We measured the additional WOB with a pneumotachograph and pressure tap at the proximal airway and calculated it from pressure-volume curves. The additional WOB ranged from 106 to 484 mJ/L. The additional WOB imposed by 5 PVs and 3 CCVs was greater than 250 mJ/L, 50% of normal WOB. Spontaneous breathing through the safety valve during ventilator failure may result in an additional WOB that is >50% of normal WOB. Increased work of breathing through the safety valve may thereby cause discomfort, respiratory muscle fatigue, and adverse events during ventilator equipment failure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImposed work of breathing during mechanical ventilator failureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Imposed work of breathing during mechanical ventilator failure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Austin, Paul</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">c/o Prof. Lynn Sommers, 405 Procter Hall, PO Box 2, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">austinm@voyager.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mechanical ventilators possess a safety valve allowing spontaneous breathing of ambient air during failure of the ventilator. Patients exhibit a substantial effort to inhale through this valve. The research hypothesis was: The additional work of breathing (WOB) imposed by a mechanical ventilator during ventilator failure is &gt;50% of normal WOB during spontaneous breathing (approximately 500 mJ/L). A modification of Campbell's model, a physiological framework describing work during spontaneous breathing, served as the theoretical framework. We used 9 portable ventilators (PVs) and 8 critical care ventilators (CCVs) as our sample. Ventilators were attached to a test lung to simulate spontaneous breathing with consistent tidal volume and peak inspiratory flow. We measured the additional WOB with a pneumotachograph and pressure tap at the proximal airway and calculated it from pressure-volume curves. The additional WOB ranged from 106 to 484 mJ/L. The additional WOB imposed by 5 PVs and 3 CCVs was greater than 250 mJ/L, 50% of normal WOB. Spontaneous breathing through the safety valve during ventilator failure may result in an additional WOB that is &gt;50% of normal WOB. Increased work of breathing through the safety valve may thereby cause discomfort, respiratory muscle fatigue, and adverse events during ventilator equipment failure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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