A grounded theory study of how depression is recognized by primary care providers in managed care settings

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160641
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A grounded theory study of how depression is recognized by primary care providers in managed care settings
Abstract:
A grounded theory study of how depression is recognized by primary care providers in managed care settings
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Baik, Seong-Yi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 265 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5219
The purpose of this study was to investigate the conditions for the recognition of depression by primary care providers. That is, under what conditions would a primary care provider in a managed care context be more or less likely to recognize depression. Using grounded theory method, in-depth interviews with primary care providers and mental health specialists (as a comparison group) in managed care settings were conducted. Compared with mental health specialists, the five important conditions for primary care providers in the recognition of depression that emerged were familiarity, symbolic meaning of having depression, conceptualization of depression, time, and experience. Although experience appeared to be an important condition for primary care providers, exactly "what makes up experience?" was unclear. Additional interviews to further investigate the dimensions of "experience," as a condition for the recognition of depression by primary care providers, helped to clarify the study findings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA grounded theory study of how depression is recognized by primary care providers in managed care settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160641-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A grounded theory study of how depression is recognized by primary care providers in managed care settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baik, Seong-Yi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 265 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5219</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seongyi.baik@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to investigate the conditions for the recognition of depression by primary care providers. That is, under what conditions would a primary care provider in a managed care context be more or less likely to recognize depression. Using grounded theory method, in-depth interviews with primary care providers and mental health specialists (as a comparison group) in managed care settings were conducted. Compared with mental health specialists, the five important conditions for primary care providers in the recognition of depression that emerged were familiarity, symbolic meaning of having depression, conceptualization of depression, time, and experience. Although experience appeared to be an important condition for primary care providers, exactly &quot;what makes up experience?&quot; was unclear. Additional interviews to further investigate the dimensions of &quot;experience,&quot; as a condition for the recognition of depression by primary care providers, helped to clarify the study findings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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