2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160645
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of design interventions on nursing home residents
Abstract:
Impact of design interventions on nursing home residents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Bostick, Jane
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, S419 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.882.0255
The American nursing home environment has been repeatedly criticized by long term advocates as "institutional" rather than "home-like." There is growing recognition that changes in the architectural framework of the nursing home can support residents' activities of daily living, behavioral patterns, and cognitive abilities. Purpose: This study examined the impact of environmental design interventions on resident outcomes using data from the nursing home Minimum Data Set (MDS). Sample: Twelve nursing home residents residing in a newly constructed wing were compared with a cohort group of twelve residents remaining in the existing units in one nursing home. Method: MDS data was collected for 24 subjects 6 months prior to and 6 months following the construction of a new wing. Data on three sections of the MDS were used to compute three subscale scores: Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS), Behavioral Symptoms Scale (BSS), and Activities of Daily Living self-performance scale (ADL). Results: The preliminary analysis revealed little change in residents' wandering behaviors following the move. Some cognitive and functional abilities appeared to improve following the move. Conclusions: Improvement in cognitive and functional abilities can be a result of environmental design changes that incorporate a more "home-like" atmosphere rather than an institutional ambiance.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of design interventions on nursing home residentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160645-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of design interventions on nursing home residents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bostick, Jane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, S419 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.882.0255</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">BostickJ@missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The American nursing home environment has been repeatedly criticized by long term advocates as &quot;institutional&quot; rather than &quot;home-like.&quot; There is growing recognition that changes in the architectural framework of the nursing home can support residents' activities of daily living, behavioral patterns, and cognitive abilities. Purpose: This study examined the impact of environmental design interventions on resident outcomes using data from the nursing home Minimum Data Set (MDS). Sample: Twelve nursing home residents residing in a newly constructed wing were compared with a cohort group of twelve residents remaining in the existing units in one nursing home. Method: MDS data was collected for 24 subjects 6 months prior to and 6 months following the construction of a new wing. Data on three sections of the MDS were used to compute three subscale scores: Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS), Behavioral Symptoms Scale (BSS), and Activities of Daily Living self-performance scale (ADL). Results: The preliminary analysis revealed little change in residents' wandering behaviors following the move. Some cognitive and functional abilities appeared to improve following the move. Conclusions: Improvement in cognitive and functional abilities can be a result of environmental design changes that incorporate a more &quot;home-like&quot; atmosphere rather than an institutional ambiance.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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