2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160646
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How do patients access tailored health information on the web?
Abstract:
How do patients access tailored health information on the web?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Brennan, Patricia, PhD, FACMI
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Madison
Title:Moehlman Bascom Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing & Engineering, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5251
Computer networks and specialized algorithms make possible the delivery of staged, tailored health information that meets the health promotion needs of individual patients. In our HeartCare project we demonstrated that an automatic concatenation algorithm permitted presentation of selected World-Wide-Web resources over a six-month period to 50 patients recovering from Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery. Patients received about 175 pages of standard information, and between 75 and 125 pages of information targeting their specific demographics and health concerns. Through analysis of server logs we determined the extent to which patients viewed tailored and general recovery information. Patients (n=10) accessed the HeartCare system an average of 1-2 times a week; however, determining exposure to tailored information requires examination of access on the level of individual Web pages within individual sessions, a non-trivial process. We examined the log files of three patients for a one week period. During a single week patients accessed the HeartCare system 1-3 times, and viewed 2-9 unique pages. Access to personally tailored information constitutes a small part of the patients' HeartCare activities. Given our prior experience, it is the event of access to health information, not the number or intensity of accesses, that provides the greatest health benefit.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow do patients access tailored health information on the web?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160646-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How do patients access tailored health information on the web?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brennan, Patricia, PhD, FACMI</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Moehlman Bascom Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing &amp; Engineering, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5251</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pbrennan@engr.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Computer networks and specialized algorithms make possible the delivery of staged, tailored health information that meets the health promotion needs of individual patients. In our HeartCare project we demonstrated that an automatic concatenation algorithm permitted presentation of selected World-Wide-Web resources over a six-month period to 50 patients recovering from Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery. Patients received about 175 pages of standard information, and between 75 and 125 pages of information targeting their specific demographics and health concerns. Through analysis of server logs we determined the extent to which patients viewed tailored and general recovery information. Patients (n=10) accessed the HeartCare system an average of 1-2 times a week; however, determining exposure to tailored information requires examination of access on the level of individual Web pages within individual sessions, a non-trivial process. We examined the log files of three patients for a one week period. During a single week patients accessed the HeartCare system 1-3 times, and viewed 2-9 unique pages. Access to personally tailored information constitutes a small part of the patients' HeartCare activities. Given our prior experience, it is the event of access to health information, not the number or intensity of accesses, that provides the greatest health benefit.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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