2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160647
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Blind faith: Parent-child relationships and participation in research
Abstract:
Blind faith: Parent-child relationships and participation in research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Broome, Marion, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama at Birmingham
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1210, USA
Contact Telephone:205.975.0343
Research on children's understanding of the consent process has largely been conducted with well children until very recently. The aim of this federally funded study was to explore chronically ill children's understanding of the research from their own perspective and their involvement in the decision to participate in a clinical trial. The sample consisted of 34 children (ages 8-17 years), with diabetes, or cancer, and at least one parent who had been enrolled in a clinical research trial. Interviews with the children and their parent(s) were held in the clinic or home and they were interviewed separately. Qualitative content and matrix analyses were used to code the transcripts. The findings described in this paper focus on the influence of the relationship of the child and parent and how it influences their participation in research trials. The three themes in the interviews of child and parents related to PC relationships were: “faith in my parents”, “building character”, and “negotiating assent”. The implications of how these perceptions influence not only recruitment, but retention of children in a clinical trial will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBlind faith: Parent-child relationships and participation in researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160647-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Blind faith: Parent-child relationships and participation in research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Broome, Marion, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama at Birmingham</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">205.975.0343</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">broomem@son.uab.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research on children's understanding of the consent process has largely been conducted with well children until very recently. The aim of this federally funded study was to explore chronically ill children's understanding of the research from their own perspective and their involvement in the decision to participate in a clinical trial. The sample consisted of 34 children (ages 8-17 years), with diabetes, or cancer, and at least one parent who had been enrolled in a clinical research trial. Interviews with the children and their parent(s) were held in the clinic or home and they were interviewed separately. Qualitative content and matrix analyses were used to code the transcripts. The findings described in this paper focus on the influence of the relationship of the child and parent and how it influences their participation in research trials. The three themes in the interviews of child and parents related to PC relationships were: &ldquo;faith in my parents&rdquo;, &ldquo;building character&rdquo;, and &ldquo;negotiating assent&rdquo;. The implications of how these perceptions influence not only recruitment, but retention of children in a clinical trial will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.