Is self-reported height or arm span the more accurate alternative measure of height?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160648
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is self-reported height or arm span the more accurate alternative measure of height?
Abstract:
Is self-reported height or arm span the more accurate alternative measure of height?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Brown, Jean
P.I. Institution Name:University of Buffalo at SUNY
Contact Address:School of Nursing 1030 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, NY, 14214-3079, USA
Contact Telephone:716.829.3228
This biometric study determined whether arm span or self-reported was the more accurate alternative measure of actual height using a physical anthropometric framework. The convenience sample included 409 individuals between the ages of 19 and 67 (mean=35.0 years). Fifty-four percent were females, and 76% were White. Data were collected by 82 undergraduate nursing research students. After measurement training, mean differences from criterion measures were 0.07 in. for measuring rules, 0.19 in. for arm span, and 0.34 in. for height. During data collection, intrarater reliability was r=.998 for height and r=.997 for arm span. The relationship of height to arm span and self-reported height were r=.69 and .75 (p<.05), respectively. Mean absolute differences were 1.83 cm and 0.86 cm, respectively. When height was regressed on arm span and self-reported height, respective R2s were 47% and 56% (p<.05). Adding gender, age, and race to the regressions increased the variance by less than 1%. In conclusion, arm span and self-reported height are both accurate measures of actual height; however, self-reported height is slightly better. These findings support the common practice of using self-reported height as an alternative measure of actual height in clinical settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs self-reported height or arm span the more accurate alternative measure of height?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160648-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Is self-reported height or arm span the more accurate alternative measure of height?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Jean</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Buffalo at SUNY</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing 1030 Kimball Tower, Buffalo, NY, 14214-3079, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">716.829.3228</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jebrown@buffalo.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This biometric study determined whether arm span or self-reported was the more accurate alternative measure of actual height using a physical anthropometric framework. The convenience sample included 409 individuals between the ages of 19 and 67 (mean=35.0 years). Fifty-four percent were females, and 76% were White. Data were collected by 82 undergraduate nursing research students. After measurement training, mean differences from criterion measures were 0.07 in. for measuring rules, 0.19 in. for arm span, and 0.34 in. for height. During data collection, intrarater reliability was r=.998 for height and r=.997 for arm span. The relationship of height to arm span and self-reported height were r=.69 and .75 (p&lt;.05), respectively. Mean absolute differences were 1.83 cm and 0.86 cm, respectively. When height was regressed on arm span and self-reported height, respective R2s were 47% and 56% (p&lt;.05). Adding gender, age, and race to the regressions increased the variance by less than 1%. In conclusion, arm span and self-reported height are both accurate measures of actual height; however, self-reported height is slightly better. These findings support the common practice of using self-reported height as an alternative measure of actual height in clinical settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.