2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160653
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive representation of illness after acute myocardial infarction
Abstract:
Cognitive representation of illness after acute myocardial infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Cherrington, Candace
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing & Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 101 University Hall, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.3852
The self-regulation model of illness (SRMI) proposes that individuals concurrently process health threats both cognitively and emotionally. Further each person's representation of illness influences the coping mechanism used and therefore the illness outcomes, such as anxiety and depression that are important to understand because of their impact on physical recovery. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive representations of illness (as measured by the illness perception questionnaire [IPQ]) and depression and anxiety (as measured by the Beck depression inventory [BDI-II] and the Spielberger state anxiety inventory [SSAI]). To date 44 subjects (22 men and 22 women) hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have completed the study. Preliminary analysis demonstrated a significant increase in both depression and anxiety with a more negative perception of illness ([depression R2=.365, R2change=.192, Fchange=6.661, p=.017] [anxiety R2=.471, R2change=.300, Fchange=12.491, p=.002]). In this sample of AMI patients there is a significant relationship between cognitive representations of illness and depression and anxiety in that patients who have a negative perception AMI are subsequently more anxious and depressed. Further research is needed to examine the impact on outcomes after AMI and what nursing interventions promote a more positive perception of AMI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive representation of illness after acute myocardial infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160653-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive representation of illness after acute myocardial infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cherrington, Candace</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, 101 University Hall, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.3852</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">candace.cherrington@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The self-regulation model of illness (SRMI) proposes that individuals concurrently process health threats both cognitively and emotionally. Further each person's representation of illness influences the coping mechanism used and therefore the illness outcomes, such as anxiety and depression that are important to understand because of their impact on physical recovery. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between cognitive representations of illness (as measured by the illness perception questionnaire [IPQ]) and depression and anxiety (as measured by the Beck depression inventory [BDI-II] and the Spielberger state anxiety inventory [SSAI]). To date 44 subjects (22 men and 22 women) hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have completed the study. Preliminary analysis demonstrated a significant increase in both depression and anxiety with a more negative perception of illness ([depression R2=.365, R2change=.192, Fchange=6.661, p=.017] [anxiety R2=.471, R2change=.300, Fchange=12.491, p=.002]). In this sample of AMI patients there is a significant relationship between cognitive representations of illness and depression and anxiety in that patients who have a negative perception AMI are subsequently more anxious and depressed. Further research is needed to examine the impact on outcomes after AMI and what nursing interventions promote a more positive perception of AMI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.