2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160662
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal loss support group intervention
Abstract:
Perinatal loss support group intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:DiMarco, Marguerite
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.7683
The purpose of the study was to determine if a support group intervention makes a difference in grief reactions of parents who have experienced a perinatal loss and what they perceived as being helpful and not helpful in handling the loss. Also, the relationship between some variables of all the participants and their grief reactions was examined. A cross-sectional, retrospective two group research design was used. The independent variable was having attended or not having attended a perinatal loss support group. Each of the 121 participants completed the Hogan Grief Reactions Checklist (HGRC) and a background questionnaire. There were no statistically significant differences in parent's grief reaction scores between the two groups. Overall, the mean scores indicated that the participants had low grief reaction scores. For the total sample, there were some significant differences in grief reaction scores in regard to gender, age, time since loss, and marital status. In both groups, the participants perceived as most helpful their spouses, extended family, and friends and the least helpful physicians and extended family. The findings imply that parents have different perceptions about support groups being helpful in dealing with a perinatal loss. Clinical and research implications will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal loss support group interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160662-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Perinatal loss support group intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DiMarco, Marguerite</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.7683</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dimarco@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to determine if a support group intervention makes a difference in grief reactions of parents who have experienced a perinatal loss and what they perceived as being helpful and not helpful in handling the loss. Also, the relationship between some variables of all the participants and their grief reactions was examined. A cross-sectional, retrospective two group research design was used. The independent variable was having attended or not having attended a perinatal loss support group. Each of the 121 participants completed the Hogan Grief Reactions Checklist (HGRC) and a background questionnaire. There were no statistically significant differences in parent's grief reaction scores between the two groups. Overall, the mean scores indicated that the participants had low grief reaction scores. For the total sample, there were some significant differences in grief reaction scores in regard to gender, age, time since loss, and marital status. In both groups, the participants perceived as most helpful their spouses, extended family, and friends and the least helpful physicians and extended family. The findings imply that parents have different perceptions about support groups being helpful in dealing with a perinatal loss. Clinical and research implications will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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