Human and environmental factors affecting registered nurse decision-making in acute care settings: Application of critical decision method

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160666
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Human and environmental factors affecting registered nurse decision-making in acute care settings: Application of critical decision method
Abstract:
Human and environmental factors affecting registered nurse decision-making in acute care settings: Application of critical decision method
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Ebright, Patricia, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 413, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Contact Telephone:317.274.7912
Observations of nurses at work, combined with Critical Decision Method (CDM) interviews, is a new methodology used in this qualitative study to understand nurse decision-making in challenging situations, particularly concerning delegation and prioritization. Time pressure, uncertain information, conflicting goals, high stakes, stress, and dynamic conditions such as variable staffing, high acuity, and unpredictability characterize decision-making in complex environments like acute care units. Based on the recognition-primed decision model, Klein developed CDM to elicit factors considered in making decisions in actual situations including goals, cue utilization, and contextual elements. Direct observations of RN work on an acute care oncology unit were followed by three CDM interviews. Findings include factors that make up the complexity of RN work and the multiple types of knowledge involved in decisions related to prioritization and delegation. CDM analysis provides insight regarding: human and environmental factors that make decision-making complex; how RNs meet conflicting goals; the role of experience; the knowledge required for decision-making; and how the health care system supports access to knowledge. These findings can be used to create artifacts to support nursing work and develop new models of acute care. Advantages, limitations and future applicability for this methodology will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHuman and environmental factors affecting registered nurse decision-making in acute care settings: Application of critical decision methoden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160666-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Human and environmental factors affecting registered nurse decision-making in acute care settings: Application of critical decision method</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ebright, Patricia, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 1111 Middle Drive, NU 413, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317.274.7912</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prebrigh@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Observations of nurses at work, combined with Critical Decision Method (CDM) interviews, is a new methodology used in this qualitative study to understand nurse decision-making in challenging situations, particularly concerning delegation and prioritization. Time pressure, uncertain information, conflicting goals, high stakes, stress, and dynamic conditions such as variable staffing, high acuity, and unpredictability characterize decision-making in complex environments like acute care units. Based on the recognition-primed decision model, Klein developed CDM to elicit factors considered in making decisions in actual situations including goals, cue utilization, and contextual elements. Direct observations of RN work on an acute care oncology unit were followed by three CDM interviews. Findings include factors that make up the complexity of RN work and the multiple types of knowledge involved in decisions related to prioritization and delegation. CDM analysis provides insight regarding: human and environmental factors that make decision-making complex; how RNs meet conflicting goals; the role of experience; the knowledge required for decision-making; and how the health care system supports access to knowledge. These findings can be used to create artifacts to support nursing work and develop new models of acute care. Advantages, limitations and future applicability for this methodology will be presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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