Physiological outcomes in caregiver intervention studies: An idea whose time has come?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160668
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiological outcomes in caregiver intervention studies: An idea whose time has come?
Abstract:
Physiological outcomes in caregiver intervention studies: An idea whose time has come?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Farran, Carol, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 600 South Paulina Avenue, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA
Contact Telephone:312.942.6955
A Stress/Coping paradigm has predominated the study of caregivers of persons with dementia. The majority of caregiver intervention studies have focused on caregiver stress and psychological distress outcomes. There is mounting evidence to support that the stress of family caregiving has physiological effects and that caregiver stress may be associated with changes in caregiver physical health. This paper will examine the state-of-the-science to determine if our current literature supports the development of caregiver intervention studies that include a combination of psychological and physiological outcomes. Two bodies of literature were reviewed: caregiver studies that included a psychoneuroimmunological focus; and clinical intervention studies that examined physiological outcomes. This review: a) identifies sampling and design issues; b) assesses physiological, psychological and physical health measurement issues; c) summarizes key findings concerning relationships amongst caregiver physiological, psychological and physical health parameters; and d) recommends how caregiver intervention research might be advanced to include physiological measures and expand our current Stress/Coping paradigm.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiological outcomes in caregiver intervention studies: An idea whose time has come?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160668-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physiological outcomes in caregiver intervention studies: An idea whose time has come?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Farran, Carol, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 600 South Paulina Avenue, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.942.6955</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cfarran@rushu.rush.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">A Stress/Coping paradigm has predominated the study of caregivers of persons with dementia. The majority of caregiver intervention studies have focused on caregiver stress and psychological distress outcomes. There is mounting evidence to support that the stress of family caregiving has physiological effects and that caregiver stress may be associated with changes in caregiver physical health. This paper will examine the state-of-the-science to determine if our current literature supports the development of caregiver intervention studies that include a combination of psychological and physiological outcomes. Two bodies of literature were reviewed: caregiver studies that included a psychoneuroimmunological focus; and clinical intervention studies that examined physiological outcomes. This review: a) identifies sampling and design issues; b) assesses physiological, psychological and physical health measurement issues; c) summarizes key findings concerning relationships amongst caregiver physiological, psychological and physical health parameters; and d) recommends how caregiver intervention research might be advanced to include physiological measures and expand our current Stress/Coping paradigm.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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