2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160669
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-resolution of alcohol problems in young adulthood
Abstract:
Self-resolution of alcohol problems in young adulthood
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Finfgeld, Deborah, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, S321 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573.884.7255
The purpose of this investigation was to better explicate why and how young adults self-resolve alcohol problems. Grounded theory provided the theoretical framework, study design, and data analysis strategies. The sample consisted of 5 males and 7 females, who ranged in age from 25 to 54 at the time of the study. To participate, individuals must have resolved their drinking problems by the age of 26 and could not have participated in any formal drug treatment programs or self-help groups. The findings suggest that self-resolving alcohol problems in young adulthood involves a temporal process of seeking and securing solid ground. This process is precipitated by situations in which individuals experience precarious footing and eventually begin to lose their balance. These culminating events lead young adults to pursue personal visions and find safe footing on solid ground, despite some rugged terrain along the way. Self-resolution of alcohol problems appears to differ between men and women, and personal assets seem to play a role in the process. It is inferred that nurses can assist young adults to self-resolve drinking problems by helping them to identify personal goals, resolve past traumas, and manage concomitant mental health problems such as depression.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-resolution of alcohol problems in young adulthooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160669-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Self-resolution of alcohol problems in young adulthood</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Finfgeld, Deborah, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, S321 Nursing Building, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573.884.7255</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">finfgeldd@health.missouri.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this investigation was to better explicate why and how young adults self-resolve alcohol problems. Grounded theory provided the theoretical framework, study design, and data analysis strategies. The sample consisted of 5 males and 7 females, who ranged in age from 25 to 54 at the time of the study. To participate, individuals must have resolved their drinking problems by the age of 26 and could not have participated in any formal drug treatment programs or self-help groups. The findings suggest that self-resolving alcohol problems in young adulthood involves a temporal process of seeking and securing solid ground. This process is precipitated by situations in which individuals experience precarious footing and eventually begin to lose their balance. These culminating events lead young adults to pursue personal visions and find safe footing on solid ground, despite some rugged terrain along the way. Self-resolution of alcohol problems appears to differ between men and women, and personal assets seem to play a role in the process. It is inferred that nurses can assist young adults to self-resolve drinking problems by helping them to identify personal goals, resolve past traumas, and manage concomitant mental health problems such as depression.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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