2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160671
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender differences in the treatment of myocardial infarction
Abstract:
Gender differences in the treatment of myocardial infarction
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Garcia, Teresa
The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of gender differences in the treatment of patients presenting to the Emergency Department with an acute myocardial infarction. This was based upon the initiation of oxygen therapy, sublingual nitroglycerin, analgesia, oral aspirin, and 12-lead ECG. Data was collected over an 18-month period and consisted of 40 men and 40 women. A t-test was used to measure differences between group means on each intervention, from triage time to implementation of the intervention. Females received oxygen sooner compared to males. All other interventions were initiated sooner in men than in women. Men initially received intravenous nitroglycerine more often than sublingual, which was used most frequently in women. Women presented with more comorbidities, men sought care sooner and presenting symptoms in men and women differed. These findings were compared to previous studies regarding gender bias in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, specifically acute myocardial infarction. Results demonstrated the need to educate Emergency Department staff in the use of the treatment guidelines and in the differences in presenting symptoms between men and women. The public must be informed about these differences to facilitate early treatment which could decrease morbidity and mortality for females.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender differences in the treatment of myocardial infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160671-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender differences in the treatment of myocardial infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garcia, Teresa</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tgarcia55@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of gender differences in the treatment of patients presenting to the Emergency Department with an acute myocardial infarction. This was based upon the initiation of oxygen therapy, sublingual nitroglycerin, analgesia, oral aspirin, and 12-lead ECG. Data was collected over an 18-month period and consisted of 40 men and 40 women. A t-test was used to measure differences between group means on each intervention, from triage time to implementation of the intervention. Females received oxygen sooner compared to males. All other interventions were initiated sooner in men than in women. Men initially received intravenous nitroglycerine more often than sublingual, which was used most frequently in women. Women presented with more comorbidities, men sought care sooner and presenting symptoms in men and women differed. These findings were compared to previous studies regarding gender bias in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, specifically acute myocardial infarction. Results demonstrated the need to educate Emergency Department staff in the use of the treatment guidelines and in the differences in presenting symptoms between men and women. The public must be informed about these differences to facilitate early treatment which could decrease morbidity and mortality for females.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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