2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160674
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interaction between low-income mother-infant and father-infant pairs
Abstract:
Interaction between low-income mother-infant and father-infant pairs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Gibbons, Cynthia
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA
Contact Telephone:517.353.8678
The Infant Mental Health Model was used to examine interaction in forty-four low-income mother-infant and father-infant pairs. Infants were under three months of age when assessed with their mothers and between four and six months of age when assessed with their fathers. The Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale (Barnard, 1994), a standardized observational scale, was used to measure interaction during home visits. Results showed that mother-infant pairs were more at risk than father-infant pairs. There were also differences in interactions between mother-infant and father-infant dyads. For instance, fathers were more sensitive to infant cues and more apt to provide cognitive growth fostering activities for their infants; mothers were more responsive to infant distress; and infants were clearer and more responsive with their fathers. While infant age was likely a factor, this study supports nurses adopting a family-centered approach in working with low-income families. Nurses can pay close attention to the contribution of mothers, fathers, and infants – pointing out the strengths and, if needed, enhancing the interaction within each dyad.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteraction between low-income mother-infant and father-infant pairsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160674-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Interaction between low-income mother-infant and father-infant pairs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gibbons, Cynthia</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, A230 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517.353.8678</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cgibbons@pilot.msu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The Infant Mental Health Model was used to examine interaction in forty-four low-income mother-infant and father-infant pairs. Infants were under three months of age when assessed with their mothers and between four and six months of age when assessed with their fathers. The Nursing Child Assessment Teaching Scale (Barnard, 1994), a standardized observational scale, was used to measure interaction during home visits. Results showed that mother-infant pairs were more at risk than father-infant pairs. There were also differences in interactions between mother-infant and father-infant dyads. For instance, fathers were more sensitive to infant cues and more apt to provide cognitive growth fostering activities for their infants; mothers were more responsive to infant distress; and infants were clearer and more responsive with their fathers. While infant age was likely a factor, this study supports nurses adopting a family-centered approach in working with low-income families. Nurses can pay close attention to the contribution of mothers, fathers, and infants &ndash; pointing out the strengths and, if needed, enhancing the interaction within each dyad.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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