2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160676
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Are mental health providers culturally responsive to clients?
Abstract:
Are mental health providers culturally responsive to clients?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Yurkovich, Eleanor
P.I. Institution Name:University of North Dakota
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA
Contact Telephone:701.777.4554
The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study is to determine if American Indians experiencing severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) are receiving culturally responsive care. Purnell and Paulanka (1998) describe culturally responsive care as a process including awareness of one's culture, recognition of diversity in others, and respectful altering of behavior and treatment approaches based on the uniqueness of the person. Literature focuses only on acute and crisis oriented problems of American Indians and fails to report culturally responsive programs. The Mental Health Report of the Surgeon General (2000) states mental health systems are ill equipped to meet the needs of lower socioeconomic, ethnic and racial minority populations. American Indians meet these criteria. Interviews were completed with 17 mental health care providers on three reservations. Preliminary findings indicate, 1) Providers need awareness that diversity within a culture can create assumptions and treatment responses not based on the patients actual perceptions, values, and cultural practices and beliefs, 2) services exist for the SPMI experiencing an acute exacerbation, 3) no community based mental health care services exist to support maintenance of the SPMI in the reservation community, and 4) a need exists for health education of families and clients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAre mental health providers culturally responsive to clients?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160676-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Are mental health providers culturally responsive to clients?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yurkovich, Eleanor</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of North Dakota</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 9025, Grand Forks, ND, 58202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">701.777.4554</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eleanor_yurkovich@mail.und.nod</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study is to determine if American Indians experiencing severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) are receiving culturally responsive care. Purnell and Paulanka (1998) describe culturally responsive care as a process including awareness of one's culture, recognition of diversity in others, and respectful altering of behavior and treatment approaches based on the uniqueness of the person. Literature focuses only on acute and crisis oriented problems of American Indians and fails to report culturally responsive programs. The Mental Health Report of the Surgeon General (2000) states mental health systems are ill equipped to meet the needs of lower socioeconomic, ethnic and racial minority populations. American Indians meet these criteria. Interviews were completed with 17 mental health care providers on three reservations. Preliminary findings indicate, 1) Providers need awareness that diversity within a culture can create assumptions and treatment responses not based on the patients actual perceptions, values, and cultural practices and beliefs, 2) services exist for the SPMI experiencing an acute exacerbation, 3) no community based mental health care services exist to support maintenance of the SPMI in the reservation community, and 4) a need exists for health education of families and clients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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