Adolescent female offenders and relational theory: Implications for nursing practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160677
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent female offenders and relational theory: Implications for nursing practice
Abstract:
Adolescent female offenders and relational theory: Implications for nursing practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Groh, Carla
P.I. Institution Name:University of Detroit Mercy
Contact Address:McAuley School of Nursing, 8200 West Outer Drive, PO Box 19900, Detroit, MI, 48219-0900, USA
Contact Telephone:313.993.6172
Purpose: This correlational descriptive study examined the behavior of adolescent female offenders within Gilligan's (1982, 1990) theoretical framework of relationships and connections. Adolescent girls now make up 27% of the population in the U.S. juvenile justice system. Girls enter the system with multiple problems and their treatment needs are different than boys, yet few studies have examined the gender-specific needs of adolescent female offenders. Method: Using a convenience sample of 42 pre-adjudicated girls, the variables attachment, conflict, and self-esteem were studied. The POSIT was used to identify problems in the areas of substance abuse, mental and physical health, family and peer relations, and education. Girls completed both a self-report questionnaire and participated in focus groups. Results: The girls reported high levels of self-esteem, close attachment to and minimal conflict with mother. Self-esteem was inversely correlated with family relationships (p=.003) and mental health (p=.013). Additionally, girls who lived with their mothers reported significantly higher levels of self-esteem than girls who did not (p=.002). Conclusions: Despite the limited sample size, the findings related to self-esteem, perceived attachment to and conflict with mother suggest possible areas of strength that nurses can use when intervening with adolescent female offenders and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent female offenders and relational theory: Implications for nursing practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160677-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent female offenders and relational theory: Implications for nursing practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Groh, Carla</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Detroit Mercy</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">McAuley School of Nursing, 8200 West Outer Drive, PO Box 19900, Detroit, MI, 48219-0900, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.993.6172</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">grohcj@udmercy.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This correlational descriptive study examined the behavior of adolescent female offenders within Gilligan's (1982, 1990) theoretical framework of relationships and connections. Adolescent girls now make up 27% of the population in the U.S. juvenile justice system. Girls enter the system with multiple problems and their treatment needs are different than boys, yet few studies have examined the gender-specific needs of adolescent female offenders. Method: Using a convenience sample of 42 pre-adjudicated girls, the variables attachment, conflict, and self-esteem were studied. The POSIT was used to identify problems in the areas of substance abuse, mental and physical health, family and peer relations, and education. Girls completed both a self-report questionnaire and participated in focus groups. Results: The girls reported high levels of self-esteem, close attachment to and minimal conflict with mother. Self-esteem was inversely correlated with family relationships (p=.003) and mental health (p=.013). Additionally, girls who lived with their mothers reported significantly higher levels of self-esteem than girls who did not (p=.002). Conclusions: Despite the limited sample size, the findings related to self-esteem, perceived attachment to and conflict with mother suggest possible areas of strength that nurses can use when intervening with adolescent female offenders and their families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.