2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160678
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Defining the dimensions of nursing intensity in ambulatory care
Abstract:
Defining the dimensions of nursing intensity in ambulatory care
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Haas, Sheila
P.I. Institution Name:Loyola University Chicago
Contact Address:Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA
Contact Telephone:773.508.3255
Understanding and measuring nursing intensity is a critical workforce issue in ambulatory care. The purpose of this study was to define ambulatory nursing intensity. Perrow's Model of Organizational Analysis (1967, 1972) served as the theoretical framework. Four potential dimensions of intensity identified in the literature were: complexity of patient need, context of care, complexity of nursing services, and capabilites that nurses bring to the encounter. A modified Delphi design was used. Questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 211 members of American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nurses. Eighty subjects participated in round one and 49 completed both rounds of the questionnaire. Paricipants rated the relevance of each potential dimension and an array of items related to each of the four dimensions. Additional dimensions,associated items, and comments were solicited. Criteria for consensus were agreement on the relevancy of the dimensions and absence of item level additions or modifications. Analysis of data led to retention of the four dimensions, addition of four items, and modification of three items. Findings can be used to structure tools to measure and specify nursing intensity for the Nursing Minimum Data Set in ambulatory care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDefining the dimensions of nursing intensity in ambulatory careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160678-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Defining the dimensions of nursing intensity in ambulatory care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Haas, Sheila</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Loyola University Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Niehoff School of Nursing, 6525 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, IL, 60626, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">773.508.3255</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shaas@luc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Understanding and measuring nursing intensity is a critical workforce issue in ambulatory care. The purpose of this study was to define ambulatory nursing intensity. Perrow's Model of Organizational Analysis (1967, 1972) served as the theoretical framework. Four potential dimensions of intensity identified in the literature were: complexity of patient need, context of care, complexity of nursing services, and capabilites that nurses bring to the encounter. A modified Delphi design was used. Questionnaires were sent to a stratified random sample of 211 members of American Academy of Ambulatory Care Nurses. Eighty subjects participated in round one and 49 completed both rounds of the questionnaire. Paricipants rated the relevance of each potential dimension and an array of items related to each of the four dimensions. Additional dimensions,associated items, and comments were solicited. Criteria for consensus were agreement on the relevancy of the dimensions and absence of item level additions or modifications. Analysis of data led to retention of the four dimensions, addition of four items, and modification of three items. Findings can be used to structure tools to measure and specify nursing intensity for the Nursing Minimum Data Set in ambulatory care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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