Identification and treatment of sleep-related problems in two general pediatric clinics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160679
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identification and treatment of sleep-related problems in two general pediatric clinics
Abstract:
Identification and treatment of sleep-related problems in two general pediatric clinics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Hedger, Kristen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan Health System
Contact Address:1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.9241
Introduction: Sleep disorders are associated with significant morbidity in children but may remain undetected. We examined the rate at which sleep problems were identified and treated in children seen at 2 general pediatrics clinics. Methods: Parents of 1038 children, aged 2.0 and 13.9 years, completed a validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), and responses were used to identify 86 subjects at risk for sleep-disordered breathing, periodic leg movements during sleep, hypersomnia, or insomnia. Charts were then reviewed for any mention of relevant symptoms, diagnoses or treatments during the past 2 years. Results: The subjects (mean age 6.6 ± 3.1, 51% male) had 103 sleep problems and 1395 chart notes were reviewed. Less than 15% of subjects had current notes that mentioned PSQ-defined sleep problems. Among the 103 sleep problems, only 16 received any mention (current or past); 10 led to a diagnosis; 4 led to an intervention; and 3 led to treatment likely to be effective. Some aspect of sleep was mentioned in 72% of the cases. Conclusions: Although health care professionals may be aware of the importance of sleep in children, several important types of sleep problems were seldom addressed. Nurses should increase efforts to identify sleep-related problems in children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentification and treatment of sleep-related problems in two general pediatric clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160679-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Identification and treatment of sleep-related problems in two general pediatric clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hedger, Kristen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.9241</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">khedger@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Introduction: Sleep disorders are associated with significant morbidity in children but may remain undetected. We examined the rate at which sleep problems were identified and treated in children seen at 2 general pediatrics clinics. Methods: Parents of 1038 children, aged 2.0 and 13.9 years, completed a validated Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire (PSQ), and responses were used to identify 86 subjects at risk for sleep-disordered breathing, periodic leg movements during sleep, hypersomnia, or insomnia. Charts were then reviewed for any mention of relevant symptoms, diagnoses or treatments during the past 2 years. Results: The subjects (mean age 6.6 &plusmn; 3.1, 51% male) had 103 sleep problems and 1395 chart notes were reviewed. Less than 15% of subjects had current notes that mentioned PSQ-defined sleep problems. Among the 103 sleep problems, only 16 received any mention (current or past); 10 led to a diagnosis; 4 led to an intervention; and 3 led to treatment likely to be effective. Some aspect of sleep was mentioned in 72% of the cases. Conclusions: Although health care professionals may be aware of the importance of sleep in children, several important types of sleep problems were seldom addressed. Nurses should increase efforts to identify sleep-related problems in children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:08:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:08:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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