Anxiety and its relationship to cognitive functioning among women newly diagnosed with breast cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160690
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Anxiety and its relationship to cognitive functioning among women newly diagnosed with breast cancer
Abstract:
Anxiety and its relationship to cognitive functioning among women newly diagnosed with breast cancer
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Cimprich, Bernadine
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, #2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0193
Anxiety is commonly reported among women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, but little research has examined its impact on cognitive functioning. This study examined anxiety and self-reported cognitive functioning before and after breast cancer surgery. A theoretical perspective of person-environment compatibility linking stressors to demand for cognitive resources was used. Eighty-one women were assessed 11 days pre-surgery (Time 1) and again about 2 weeks post-surgery (Time 2) measuring anxiety with the Profile of Mood States (POMS) subscale, and cognitive function with the Attentional Function Index (AFI). Anxiety level at Time 1 was moderate overall, but high in >25% of the participants, with significant declines occurring at Time 2 (p=.000). AFI scores suggested moderate effectiveness in cognitive functioning at Time 1 with further decline at Time 2. Significant inverse relationships between anxiety and cognitive functioning at both Time 1 (r=-.281, p=.011) and Time 2 (r=-.345, p=.003) were identified. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant (p<.05) interaction over time with higher anxiety at Time 1 leading to poorer effectiveness in cognitive functioning at Time 2. The findings indicate that women who experience higher anxiety before surgery are at greater risk for less effective cognitive function, and thus require targeted nursing intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAnxiety and its relationship to cognitive functioning among women newly diagnosed with breast canceren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160690-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Anxiety and its relationship to cognitive functioning among women newly diagnosed with breast cancer</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cimprich, Bernadine</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, #2172, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0193</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cimprich@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Anxiety is commonly reported among women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, but little research has examined its impact on cognitive functioning. This study examined anxiety and self-reported cognitive functioning before and after breast cancer surgery. A theoretical perspective of person-environment compatibility linking stressors to demand for cognitive resources was used. Eighty-one women were assessed 11 days pre-surgery (Time 1) and again about 2 weeks post-surgery (Time 2) measuring anxiety with the Profile of Mood States (POMS) subscale, and cognitive function with the Attentional Function Index (AFI). Anxiety level at Time 1 was moderate overall, but high in &gt;25% of the participants, with significant declines occurring at Time 2 (p=.000). AFI scores suggested moderate effectiveness in cognitive functioning at Time 1 with further decline at Time 2. Significant inverse relationships between anxiety and cognitive functioning at both Time 1 (r=-.281, p=.011) and Time 2 (r=-.345, p=.003) were identified. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant (p&lt;.05) interaction over time with higher anxiety at Time 1 leading to poorer effectiveness in cognitive functioning at Time 2. The findings indicate that women who experience higher anxiety before surgery are at greater risk for less effective cognitive function, and thus require targeted nursing intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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