2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160692
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Social capital: Community resources for families
Abstract:
Social capital: Community resources for families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Looman, Wendy
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:517.668.0462
This qualitative study is one step in a process of instrument development for the measurement of social capital. The purpose of this study was to validate and add contextual meaning to themes of social capital as a health resource for families with chronically ill children. This study is guided by the human ecology and symbolic interaction conceptual frameworks. Four focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 23 mothers and fathers, drawn from a county-wide list of approximately 200 families identified as having a child with a chronic illness. A non-categorical characterization of the target child's illness was used based on Rolland's psychosocial typology. Participants were guided in a discussion of experiences with resources in their communities. Themes identified through tape-based analysis were consistent with eight abstract attributes (deserving, belonging, role satisfaction, interacting, informing, strategic networking, empathy, and resourcefulness) previously identified for the concept of social capital through concept analysis. Additional themes identified were: trust, advocacy as a necessity, and working with the system. These results provide support for ongoing concept development and clear direction for the development of items for the Family Social Capital Survey (FSCS), a quantitative instrument being developed to measure social capital in families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSocial capital: Community resources for familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160692-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Social capital: Community resources for families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Looman, Wendy</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">517.668.0462</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wlooman@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This qualitative study is one step in a process of instrument development for the measurement of social capital. The purpose of this study was to validate and add contextual meaning to themes of social capital as a health resource for families with chronically ill children. This study is guided by the human ecology and symbolic interaction conceptual frameworks. Four focus groups were conducted with a convenience sample of 23 mothers and fathers, drawn from a county-wide list of approximately 200 families identified as having a child with a chronic illness. A non-categorical characterization of the target child's illness was used based on Rolland's psychosocial typology. Participants were guided in a discussion of experiences with resources in their communities. Themes identified through tape-based analysis were consistent with eight abstract attributes (deserving, belonging, role satisfaction, interacting, informing, strategic networking, empathy, and resourcefulness) previously identified for the concept of social capital through concept analysis. Additional themes identified were: trust, advocacy as a necessity, and working with the system. These results provide support for ongoing concept development and clear direction for the development of items for the Family Social Capital Survey (FSCS), a quantitative instrument being developed to measure social capital in families.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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