Women prior to menopause demonstrate age-related impairments during a hospital sleep challenge

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160693
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women prior to menopause demonstrate age-related impairments during a hospital sleep challenge
Abstract:
Women prior to menopause demonstrate age-related impairments during a hospital sleep challenge
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Lukacs, Jane
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.936.3590
Sleep disturbances are common during middle-age, and in women, have been attributed to menopause symptoms brought on by estrogen withdrawal. To distinguish subtle differences between aging vs estrogen effects, we studied sleep architecture during an episode of disturbed hospital sleep in 3 groups of healthy volunteers differing on age or menopause status: 15 young cycling (YC; 20-30 yrs), 14 older cycling (OC; 40-50 yrs), and 12 postmenopausal women (PM; 40-50 yrs). Subjects were admitted to the University Hospital GCRC at 7am (follicular phase if cycling) for a 28 hr protocol of IV blood sampling q10 min. Sleep architecture, determined by polysomnographic monitoring (11pm-7am), was scored (Rechtschaffen-Kales method). Estradiol was similar in OC and YC (94+18 vs 77+13), but lower in PM (40+10 pg/ml, p=0.005). OC had longer wakefulness (97+11 vs 66+13 mins, p=0.03), longer latency to REM stage (119+15 vs 76+11 mins, p=0.03), and shorter % REM (20+2 vs 24+2 %, p=0.03) vs YC. Compared to PM, OC had reduced % stage 3-4 sleep (10+1 vs 14+1%, p=0.02). Some sleep impairments during middle-age may precede the loss of estrogen at menopause. Wakefulness and reduced REM sleep persist after menopause, but the % of deep sleep is restored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen prior to menopause demonstrate age-related impairments during a hospital sleep challengeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160693-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women prior to menopause demonstrate age-related impairments during a hospital sleep challenge</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lukacs, Jane</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.936.3590</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lukacsj@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Sleep disturbances are common during middle-age, and in women, have been attributed to menopause symptoms brought on by estrogen withdrawal. To distinguish subtle differences between aging vs estrogen effects, we studied sleep architecture during an episode of disturbed hospital sleep in 3 groups of healthy volunteers differing on age or menopause status: 15 young cycling (YC; 20-30 yrs), 14 older cycling (OC; 40-50 yrs), and 12 postmenopausal women (PM; 40-50 yrs). Subjects were admitted to the University Hospital GCRC at 7am (follicular phase if cycling) for a 28 hr protocol of IV blood sampling q10 min. Sleep architecture, determined by polysomnographic monitoring (11pm-7am), was scored (Rechtschaffen-Kales method). Estradiol was similar in OC and YC (94+18 vs 77+13), but lower in PM (40+10 pg/ml, p=0.005). OC had longer wakefulness (97+11 vs 66+13 mins, p=0.03), longer latency to REM stage (119+15 vs 76+11 mins, p=0.03), and shorter % REM (20+2 vs 24+2 %, p=0.03) vs YC. Compared to PM, OC had reduced % stage 3-4 sleep (10+1 vs 14+1%, p=0.02). Some sleep impairments during middle-age may precede the loss of estrogen at menopause. Wakefulness and reduced REM sleep persist after menopause, but the % of deep sleep is restored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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