2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160696
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV infection as a catalyst for changing health behavior
Abstract:
HIV infection as a catalyst for changing health behavior
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Mallory, Caroline
P.I. Institution Name:Illinois State University
Contact Address:Mennonite College of Nursing 211 Edwards Hall Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA
Contact Telephone:309.438.2659
The context and experiences leading to HIV infection among African-American women living in North Carolina were examined to further develop the theory of awakening as a partial guide for developing interventions to prevent exposure to HIV among women at high risk. Grounded theory methodology guided the collection of in-depth interviews with 10 women living with HIV. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze data, construct major categories and develop relationships among those categories. Women ranged in age from 30-64, supported children on monthly incomes of $0.00-$2200.00, and had been living with HIV 2-14 years. Women were reluctant to discuss the events leading up to their infection, preferring to describe their progress in leading a "normal" life since infection. Women had focused their lives on future goals and attending to their present responsibilities. Women reported that being HIV positive was a catalyst for making important and dramatic changes in their lives, sometimes leading to improved health. HIV infection may constitute an awakening for some women leading to important changes in health related behavior. Interventions designed to improve health and quality of life among women living with HIV may be enhanced by taking advantage of women's new found awareness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV infection as a catalyst for changing health behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160696-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV infection as a catalyst for changing health behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mallory, Caroline</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Illinois State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Mennonite College of Nursing 211 Edwards Hall Campus Box 5810, Normal, IL, 61790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">309.438.2659</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmmallo@ilstu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The context and experiences leading to HIV infection among African-American women living in North Carolina were examined to further develop the theory of awakening as a partial guide for developing interventions to prevent exposure to HIV among women at high risk. Grounded theory methodology guided the collection of in-depth interviews with 10 women living with HIV. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze data, construct major categories and develop relationships among those categories. Women ranged in age from 30-64, supported children on monthly incomes of $0.00-$2200.00, and had been living with HIV 2-14 years. Women were reluctant to discuss the events leading up to their infection, preferring to describe their progress in leading a &quot;normal&quot; life since infection. Women had focused their lives on future goals and attending to their present responsibilities. Women reported that being HIV positive was a catalyst for making important and dramatic changes in their lives, sometimes leading to improved health. HIV infection may constitute an awakening for some women leading to important changes in health related behavior. Interventions designed to improve health and quality of life among women living with HIV may be enhanced by taking advantage of women's new found awareness.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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