2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160701
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ventilator-associated pneumonia: A study of related practice behaviors
Abstract:
Ventilator-associated pneumonia: A study of related practice behaviors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:McCurren, Cynthia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 555 South Floyd Street, Room 3019, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:502.852.5366
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess practice variables that could contribute to a high rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The goal was to substantiate if practice behaviors were indeed an issue, requiring change. Theoretical Framework: Change theory suggests that individuals must believe there is a need for change, in order to engage in the change process readily. Sample/Method: Health care providers in critical care areas were randomly observed by nurses during two 24 hour periods while delivering care to ventilator-dependent patients. Interrater reliability was established; variables were precisely operationalized. Personnel were not informed of the study. Results: Among 428 opportunities for handwashing, no effort to wash hands totaled 270. Among all patients with tube feedings, the head of bed was in an incorrect position in 32 out of 122 observations. In 100 observations of suctioning, incorrect technique occurred 84 times. Only 35 oral care events were observed. All results were examined in terms of caregiver group, shift, and unit, with chi-square or ANOVA applied to examine relationships. Conclusions: The outcome has been the formation of a task force, research-based changes in practice, and the initiation of a related research project focused on oral care in collaboration with the School of Dentistry.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVentilator-associated pneumonia: A study of related practice behaviorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160701-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ventilator-associated pneumonia: A study of related practice behaviors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCurren, Cynthia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 555 South Floyd Street, Room 3019, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502.852.5366</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camccu01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess practice variables that could contribute to a high rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The goal was to substantiate if practice behaviors were indeed an issue, requiring change. Theoretical Framework: Change theory suggests that individuals must believe there is a need for change, in order to engage in the change process readily. Sample/Method: Health care providers in critical care areas were randomly observed by nurses during two 24 hour periods while delivering care to ventilator-dependent patients. Interrater reliability was established; variables were precisely operationalized. Personnel were not informed of the study. Results: Among 428 opportunities for handwashing, no effort to wash hands totaled 270. Among all patients with tube feedings, the head of bed was in an incorrect position in 32 out of 122 observations. In 100 observations of suctioning, incorrect technique occurred 84 times. Only 35 oral care events were observed. All results were examined in terms of caregiver group, shift, and unit, with chi-square or ANOVA applied to examine relationships. Conclusions: The outcome has been the formation of a task force, research-based changes in practice, and the initiation of a related research project focused on oral care in collaboration with the School of Dentistry.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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