Hardiness, threat appraisal, self-care capability, and caregiving characteristics as predictors of caregiver emotions and perceived health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160702
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hardiness, threat appraisal, self-care capability, and caregiving characteristics as predictors of caregiver emotions and perceived health
Abstract:
Hardiness, threat appraisal, self-care capability, and caregiving characteristics as predictors of caregiver emotions and perceived health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:McKinney, Melody
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana State University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 749 Chestnut Street, SN 316, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA
Contact Telephone:812.237.3485
Caregivers of cancer patients are at risk for health disturbances possibly because of difficulty maintaining self-care while managing caregiving stressors. Lazarus’ stress theory was used to identify predictors of anxiety, depression, and perceived health. A subset sample (n=31) completed the Threat, Health-Related Hardiness, and Exercise of Self-Care Agency scales. Data on the MOS-36 Health Survey, Caregiving Preparation, Caregiver Involvement, State Anxiety, and CES-Depression scales were obtained from a larger study. Model variables (multiple regression, alpha < .01) predicted anxiety, depression, and mental health during early caregiving; and depression, vitality, mental health, and health transition after six months. Early individual predictors included hardiness, threat, and ADL involvement. Six-month predictors included threat and self-care agency. Findings support two premises of cognitive-stress theory: (a) appraisal influences adaptational outcomes, and (b) personal resources lessen the impact of stress. Caregivers who initially appraised their situations as threatening and were more involved in patient ADLs experienced poorer emotional outcomes; less hardy caregivers experienced self-care disturbances. Continued high threat and low self-care agency were related to depression and perceived health disturbances. Nurses are in a unique position to anticipate problems and provide timely intervention to help prevent health deterioration in this vulnerable group of care providers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHardiness, threat appraisal, self-care capability, and caregiving characteristics as predictors of caregiver emotions and perceived healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160702-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Hardiness, threat appraisal, self-care capability, and caregiving characteristics as predictors of caregiver emotions and perceived health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McKinney, Melody</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 749 Chestnut Street, SN 316, Terre Haute, IN, 47809, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812.237.3485</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">m-mckinney@indstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Caregivers of cancer patients are at risk for health disturbances possibly because of difficulty maintaining self-care while managing caregiving stressors. Lazarus&rsquo; stress theory was used to identify predictors of anxiety, depression, and perceived health. A subset sample (n=31) completed the Threat, Health-Related Hardiness, and Exercise of Self-Care Agency scales. Data on the MOS-36 Health Survey, Caregiving Preparation, Caregiver Involvement, State Anxiety, and CES-Depression scales were obtained from a larger study. Model variables (multiple regression, alpha &lt; .01) predicted anxiety, depression, and mental health during early caregiving; and depression, vitality, mental health, and health transition after six months. Early individual predictors included hardiness, threat, and ADL involvement. Six-month predictors included threat and self-care agency. Findings support two premises of cognitive-stress theory: (a) appraisal influences adaptational outcomes, and (b) personal resources lessen the impact of stress. Caregivers who initially appraised their situations as threatening and were more involved in patient ADLs experienced poorer emotional outcomes; less hardy caregivers experienced self-care disturbances. Continued high threat and low self-care agency were related to depression and perceived health disturbances. Nurses are in a unique position to anticipate problems and provide timely intervention to help prevent health deterioration in this vulnerable group of care providers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.