2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160704
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors influencing the postoperative pain experience of women
Abstract:
Factors influencing the postoperative pain experience of women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Moddeman, Gail
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing & Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA
Contact Telephone:937.775.3131
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of age, education, postoperative state-anxiety, attitudes and beliefs about pain, and prior pain experiences on postoperative pain ratings and analgesia use. The Gate Control Theory of Pain provided the framework for this study. Sample: Eighty-five Caucasian women experiencing an abdominal hysterectomy consented to participate in this study. All women were in good preoperative health, had a preoperative diagnosis other than cancer, received general anesthesia, and analgesia per PCA. Method: Data collection included an interview, visual analogue scales measuring incisional pain, state-anxiety, and agreement or disagreement with statements about attitudes and beliefs related to pain. Chart review provided data about analgesia received perioperatively. All analgesia were converted to morphine equivalents. Results: State-anxiety accounted for 18% of the variance in (present) postoperative pain, while years of education explained another 8%. Analgesia use was explained by age, with older women receiving less analgesia. Conclusions: Postoperative state-anxiety should be assessed, as well as, the woman's present pain. Findings also suggest the need for more frequent pain assessment of verbal and nonverbal indicators of pain and reassurance to older adults that using analgesia postoperatively can assist in their recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors influencing the postoperative pain experience of womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160704-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors influencing the postoperative pain experience of women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Moddeman, Gail</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing &amp; Health, 3640 Colonel Glenn Highway, Dayton, OH, 45435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">937.775.3131</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bmoddeman@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of age, education, postoperative state-anxiety, attitudes and beliefs about pain, and prior pain experiences on postoperative pain ratings and analgesia use. The Gate Control Theory of Pain provided the framework for this study. Sample: Eighty-five Caucasian women experiencing an abdominal hysterectomy consented to participate in this study. All women were in good preoperative health, had a preoperative diagnosis other than cancer, received general anesthesia, and analgesia per PCA. Method: Data collection included an interview, visual analogue scales measuring incisional pain, state-anxiety, and agreement or disagreement with statements about attitudes and beliefs related to pain. Chart review provided data about analgesia received perioperatively. All analgesia were converted to morphine equivalents. Results: State-anxiety accounted for 18% of the variance in (present) postoperative pain, while years of education explained another 8%. Analgesia use was explained by age, with older women receiving less analgesia. Conclusions: Postoperative state-anxiety should be assessed, as well as, the woman's present pain. Findings also suggest the need for more frequent pain assessment of verbal and nonverbal indicators of pain and reassurance to older adults that using analgesia postoperatively can assist in their recovery.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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