2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160705
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A measure of cultural diversity
Abstract:
A measure of cultural diversity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Mood, Darlene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Sr. Res. Scientist
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.4169
The concept of cultural diversity is identified in nursing research but typically operationalized as race. The richness of the concept is lost in this biological definition. The pilot and initial testing of a measure to assess cultural diversity consistent with the concept taps beliefs, values, and practices found in the literature on culture, and individuals’ reports about how culture is manifested in everyday life. The Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS) currently consists of 26 items, including 15 items asking: How often do you…answered on a 5-point scale, 1 dichotomous item, 1 fill-in question (five choices), 1 overall self-assessment (for concurrent validity testing), and 6 unscored set-up items for scored items that follow. Pilot testing on 60 adults representing 12 cultural groups revealed an Cronbach’s alpha of .76. The most recent version, completed by 543 patients who participated in the investigators’ study of patients receiving radiotherapy for cancer in a major midwest urban setting, showed an overall Cronbach’s alpha of .82, and a concurrent validity coefficient of .69. This sample included 64 self-identified cultural groups; racially, about 49% of participants were African-American/Black, 48% were white, and 3% were other (by self-identification using the NIH scale of race/ethnicity).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA measure of cultural diversityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160705-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A measure of cultural diversity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mood, Darlene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Sr. Res. Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.4169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmood@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The concept of cultural diversity is identified in nursing research but typically operationalized as race. The richness of the concept is lost in this biological definition. The pilot and initial testing of a measure to assess cultural diversity consistent with the concept taps beliefs, values, and practices found in the literature on culture, and individuals&rsquo; reports about how culture is manifested in everyday life. The Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS) currently consists of 26 items, including 15 items asking: How often do you&hellip;answered on a 5-point scale, 1 dichotomous item, 1 fill-in question (five choices), 1 overall self-assessment (for concurrent validity testing), and 6 unscored set-up items for scored items that follow. Pilot testing on 60 adults representing 12 cultural groups revealed an Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha of .76. The most recent version, completed by 543 patients who participated in the investigators&rsquo; study of patients receiving radiotherapy for cancer in a major midwest urban setting, showed an overall Cronbach&rsquo;s alpha of .82, and a concurrent validity coefficient of .69. This sample included 64 self-identified cultural groups; racially, about 49% of participants were African-American/Black, 48% were white, and 3% were other (by self-identification using the NIH scale of race/ethnicity).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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