Effects of a family intervention on the quality of life of breast cancer patients and their caregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160711
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a family intervention on the quality of life of breast cancer patients and their caregivers
Abstract:
Effects of a family intervention on the quality of life of breast cancer patients and their caregivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Northouse, Laurel, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 4346 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.615.4016
Family caregivers of women with advanced cancer often feel unprepared for their role and report elevated distress as they try to manage multiple demands associated with the illness. The purpose of this study was to test a family intervention designed to assist women with recurrent breast cancer and their caregivers to enhance their quality of life following disease progression. The intervention, based on stress-coping theory, consisted of three home visits and two follow-up phone calls. Program content addressed family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. The intervention was tested in a randomized clinical trial with 200 patient/family member dyads. Several variables (hopelessness, self-efficacy, appraisal of illness), as well as quality of life (SF-36, FACT-B) were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months with established instruments. Results indicated that women who received the family intervention reported less hopelessness, F (1,163)=10.52, p=.001, and less negative appraisal of illness F (1,163)=4.75, p=.03, at 3 months follow-up than controls. Their family members reported less negative appraisals F (1,163)=9.5, p=.002, and better mental health, F (1,163)=4.1, p <.05. These significant effects were not sustained at 6 months as the disease progressed. Nursing implications and challenges of family research will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a family intervention on the quality of life of breast cancer patients and their caregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160711-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effects of a family intervention on the quality of life of breast cancer patients and their caregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Northouse, Laurel, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, 4346 SNB, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.615.4016</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lnortho@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family caregivers of women with advanced cancer often feel unprepared for their role and report elevated distress as they try to manage multiple demands associated with the illness. The purpose of this study was to test a family intervention designed to assist women with recurrent breast cancer and their caregivers to enhance their quality of life following disease progression. The intervention, based on stress-coping theory, consisted of three home visits and two follow-up phone calls. Program content addressed family involvement, optimistic attitude, coping effectiveness, uncertainty reduction, and symptom management. The intervention was tested in a randomized clinical trial with 200 patient/family member dyads. Several variables (hopelessness, self-efficacy, appraisal of illness), as well as quality of life (SF-36, FACT-B) were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months with established instruments. Results indicated that women who received the family intervention reported less hopelessness, F (1,163)=10.52, p=.001, and less negative appraisal of illness F (1,163)=4.75, p=.03, at 3 months follow-up than controls. Their family members reported less negative appraisals F (1,163)=9.5, p=.002, and better mental health, F (1,163)=4.1, p &lt;.05. These significant effects were not sustained at 6 months as the disease progressed. Nursing implications and challenges of family research will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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