2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160716
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preparing Families for the Withdrawal of Life Support in the Intensive Care Unit
Abstract:
Preparing Families for the Withdrawal of Life Support in the Intensive Care Unit
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Martin, Jenna
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin - Madison
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 2525 University Ave. - Apt G, Madison, WI, 53705, USA
Contact Telephone:6084447473
Approximately 20% of US deaths occur in the ICU. Most die following the withholding or withdrawal of life support (WDLS). Literature recommends preparing families for WDLS but does not provide the needed content. Four preparatory messages were developed, tailored to the patientÆs condition and clinician's preference for method of WDLS based on Johnson's Self-Regulation Theory. In a randomized controlled experimental design the next of kin of twenty ICU patients who will have WDLS will be randomly assigned to either control or experimental group. The experimental next of kin and family members who wish to participate will be read the tailored intervention. Control group subjects will receive usual care. Three weeks later, the next of kin will be contacted by phone for an interview evaluating their experience and mood profile at the time of WDLS. This study will specifically assess whether families that receive preparatory information experience better mood states, decreased emotional distress, and improved coping with WDLS than those who do not receive it. It examines whether providing specific information about what withdrawal will be like, will help the families anticipate more realistically what to expect and choose to be with the patient during WDLS more frequently. It is hypothesized that families that receive the intervention will have less painful and disturbing memories surrounding their loved one's death because the schema developed will enhance their interpretation and understanding about the experience. Demographic information will be summarized by group assignment. Projected analysis will be comparisons between experimental and control groups, using Mann-Whitney U test to assess differences in mood scores and evaluation of preparation experienced. If the information is helpful, perhaps families will more often be present at the bedside and interact with the dying patient.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreparing Families for the Withdrawal of Life Support in the Intensive Care Uniten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160716-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preparing Families for the Withdrawal of Life Support in the Intensive Care Unit</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martin, Jenna</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin - Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 2525 University Ave. - Apt G, Madison, WI, 53705, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6084447473</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jennamartin@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 20% of US deaths occur in the ICU. Most die following the withholding or withdrawal of life support (WDLS). Literature recommends preparing families for WDLS but does not provide the needed content. Four preparatory messages were developed, tailored to the patient&AElig;s condition and clinician's preference for method of WDLS based on Johnson's Self-Regulation Theory. In a randomized controlled experimental design the next of kin of twenty ICU patients who will have WDLS will be randomly assigned to either control or experimental group. The experimental next of kin and family members who wish to participate will be read the tailored intervention. Control group subjects will receive usual care. Three weeks later, the next of kin will be contacted by phone for an interview evaluating their experience and mood profile at the time of WDLS. This study will specifically assess whether families that receive preparatory information experience better mood states, decreased emotional distress, and improved coping with WDLS than those who do not receive it. It examines whether providing specific information about what withdrawal will be like, will help the families anticipate more realistically what to expect and choose to be with the patient during WDLS more frequently. It is hypothesized that families that receive the intervention will have less painful and disturbing memories surrounding their loved one's death because the schema developed will enhance their interpretation and understanding about the experience. Demographic information will be summarized by group assignment. Projected analysis will be comparisons between experimental and control groups, using Mann-Whitney U test to assess differences in mood scores and evaluation of preparation experienced. If the information is helpful, perhaps families will more often be present at the bedside and interact with the dying patient.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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