2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160718
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Management in the Home and Community Based Long-term Care Setting
Abstract:
Medication Management in the Home and Community Based Long-term Care Setting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2010
Author:Spoelstra, Sandra, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Michigan State University
Title:College of Nursing
Contact Address:500 Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA
Contact Telephone:(517)334-2983
Co-Authors:S.L. Spoelstra, College of Nursing, MSU, East Lansing, MI; B. Given, College of Nursing, MSU, East Lansing, MI; M. You, College of Nursing, MSU, East Lansing, MI; C. Given, College of Medicine, MSU, East Lansing, MI;
Background and Significance: Medication use can place older adults at risk for falls and increased health care utilization. A need exists to better understand medication use in the community dwelling elderly and how it may contribute to falls and utilization of health care services. Purpose: This study compares and contrasts those elderly with a significant amount of medications to those without a significant amount of medications to determine if certain types, as well as the number of medications impacts falls, ER use, or hospitalization. The first hypothesis is that there is a higher rate of falls, ER, and hospital use in patients with more medications. The second hypothesis is that there is a relationship between certain of these drug classes and falls, ER, and hospital use. Scientific Framework: A modified life-course aging model is used to examine individual and environmental factors that affect health. Functional status and health care treatments influence outcomes and quality of life. Methods: This is a retrospective, cross-sectional secondary analysis of the Minimum Data Set in a Home and Community Based program in 2007, examining elderly age 65 and older in a State in the Midwest. A multivariate regression model with Maximum Likelihood Estimates with a Wald Chi-square will be used to examine interactions among the variables in order to construct the final model for this study. Results and Conclusions: Results will be reported. Preliminary analyses suggest that among patients with some limitations in ADL and who are prescribed anti-depressant medications may fall more. The research proposed is unique in that it focuses on elderly medication use and compares them to like elderly without frequent medication use to describe if falls, ER use, and hospitalizations are different in this population. These findings will be used to allocate valuable nursing time towards those patients who "need" more intense management and to design effective models of care that will assist elderly to continue to live in the community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Management in the Home and Community Based Long-term Care Settingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160718-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Management in the Home and Community Based Long-term Care Setting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Spoelstra, Sandra, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Michigan State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 Fee Hall, East Lansing, MI, 48824, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(517)334-2983</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">spoelst5@msu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S.L. Spoelstra, College of Nursing, MSU, East Lansing, MI; B. Given, College of Nursing, MSU, East Lansing, MI; M. You, College of Nursing, MSU, East Lansing, MI; C. Given, College of Medicine, MSU, East Lansing, MI;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background and Significance: Medication use can place older adults at risk for falls and increased health care utilization. A need exists to better understand medication use in the community dwelling elderly and how it may contribute to falls and utilization of health care services. Purpose: This study compares and contrasts those elderly with a significant amount of medications to those without a significant amount of medications to determine if certain types, as well as the number of medications impacts falls, ER use, or hospitalization. The first hypothesis is that there is a higher rate of falls, ER, and hospital use in patients with more medications. The second hypothesis is that there is a relationship between certain of these drug classes and falls, ER, and hospital use. Scientific Framework: A modified life-course aging model is used to examine individual and environmental factors that affect health. Functional status and health care treatments influence outcomes and quality of life. Methods: This is a retrospective, cross-sectional secondary analysis of the Minimum Data Set in a Home and Community Based program in 2007, examining elderly age 65 and older in a State in the Midwest. A multivariate regression model with Maximum Likelihood Estimates with a Wald Chi-square will be used to examine interactions among the variables in order to construct the final model for this study. Results and Conclusions: Results will be reported. Preliminary analyses suggest that among patients with some limitations in ADL and who are prescribed anti-depressant medications may fall more. The research proposed is unique in that it focuses on elderly medication use and compares them to like elderly without frequent medication use to describe if falls, ER use, and hospitalizations are different in this population. These findings will be used to allocate valuable nursing time towards those patients who &quot;need&quot; more intense management and to design effective models of care that will assist elderly to continue to live in the community.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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