2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160719
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Drug-Dosage Calculation Tests ? What Are We Testing?
Abstract:
Drug-Dosage Calculation Tests ? What Are We Testing?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2009
Author:Comrie, Rhonda, P
P.I. Institution Name:SIU Edwardsville
Title:Primary Care Nursing
Contact Address:Box 1066, AH 2308, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA
Contact Telephone:618-650-3935
Co-Authors:R.W. Comrie, R. Yakimo, Primary Care and Health Systems, SIUE School of Nursing, Edwardsville, IL;
The purpose of this research was to assess the content of drug-dosage calculation tests related to types of questions and progression of complexity across courses in five semesters of the nursing major. Sample drug dosage calculation tests were reviewed from all courses that tested the content in sophomore, junior, and senior level courses. In an effort to better understand how faculty teach or reinforce learning about drug dosage calculation, focus groups were offered to nursing faculty members. Safe medication administration concepts were discussed as well. The drug dosage calculation tests were analyzed according to the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to determine at what level test items were being written. Analysis showed that most test items focused on calculating for dosage only, with very few questions requiring further critical thinking on the part of the student. Basic drug dosage calculations were judged to be at the Applying level of the taxonomy (Level 3). Questions that required the student to structure or differentiate data in the stem were deemed to be at the Analyzing level (Level 4). Finally, very few items that required the student to make judgments about whether the dose was safe to give were placed at the Evaluating level of the taxonomy (Level 5). The testing did not consistently increased in complexity over the course of the curriculum. Statistical analysis was performed on overall scores for two courses. Items that showed increased levels of difficulty were reviewed to determine the errors students made in solving the drug dose calculations. Most of the errors made involved calculating IV drips, determining decimal conversions, using milliequivalents, and distinguishing between essential and superfluous information within a problem. A medication safety administration testing program was recommended to the Curriculum Committee for implementation within the School of Nursing. The program recommends that testing should progress from Lower-order thinking to Higher-order thinking as the student advances in the nursing curriculum. We also emphasized addressing the many ways besides miscalculation by which medication errors occur according to the IOM Report.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDrug-Dosage Calculation Tests ? What Are We Testing?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160719-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Drug-Dosage Calculation Tests ? What Are We Testing?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Comrie, Rhonda, P</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">SIU Edwardsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Primary Care Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Box 1066, AH 2308, Edwardsville, IL, 62026, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">618-650-3935</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rcomrie@siue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">R.W. Comrie, R. Yakimo, Primary Care and Health Systems, SIUE School of Nursing, Edwardsville, IL;</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this research was to assess the content of drug-dosage calculation tests related to types of questions and progression of complexity across courses in five semesters of the nursing major. Sample drug dosage calculation tests were reviewed from all courses that tested the content in sophomore, junior, and senior level courses. In an effort to better understand how faculty teach or reinforce learning about drug dosage calculation, focus groups were offered to nursing faculty members. Safe medication administration concepts were discussed as well. The drug dosage calculation tests were analyzed according to the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to determine at what level test items were being written. Analysis showed that most test items focused on calculating for dosage only, with very few questions requiring further critical thinking on the part of the student. Basic drug dosage calculations were judged to be at the Applying level of the taxonomy (Level 3). Questions that required the student to structure or differentiate data in the stem were deemed to be at the Analyzing level (Level 4). Finally, very few items that required the student to make judgments about whether the dose was safe to give were placed at the Evaluating level of the taxonomy (Level 5). The testing did not consistently increased in complexity over the course of the curriculum. Statistical analysis was performed on overall scores for two courses. Items that showed increased levels of difficulty were reviewed to determine the errors students made in solving the drug dose calculations. Most of the errors made involved calculating IV drips, determining decimal conversions, using milliequivalents, and distinguishing between essential and superfluous information within a problem. A medication safety administration testing program was recommended to the Curriculum Committee for implementation within the School of Nursing. The program recommends that testing should progress from Lower-order thinking to Higher-order thinking as the student advances in the nursing curriculum. We also emphasized addressing the many ways besides miscalculation by which medication errors occur according to the IOM Report.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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