2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160724
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaning ascribed to the cancer pain experience by Thai patients
Abstract:
Meaning ascribed to the cancer pain experience by Thai patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Petpichetchian, Wongchan
P.I. Institution Name:Prince of Songkla University
Contact Address:Faculty of Nursing, Hat Yai, Songkla, 90110, Thailand
Pain is one of the most overwhelming symptoms of cancer and is recognized as a complex multidimensional phenomenon. Western literature suggests that meaning ascribed to pain is one of the cognitive factors influencing pain responses and emotional disturbance. Little research has been conducted with Eastern populations. This study explores the meaning of cancer pain and examines the relationships between perceived meaning and pain responses and emotional disturbance within a conceptual model derived from the Gate Control theory and Lazarus’s stress and coping framework. One hundred Thai outpatients who were experiencing cancer-related pain and who voluntarily agreed to participate while visiting the National Cancer Institute and a university hospital comprised the sample. Data were collected using the Brief Pain Inventory, the Profile of Mood States-Short Form, and the Perceived Meaning of Cancer Pain Inventory. Regression analyses revealed that how patients ascribed meaning to their cancer pain influenced subjective pain intensity, pain interference, and mood. Age and gender did not play a role in the pain experience of Thai cancer patients. These findings have implications for nursing practices in planning interventions to attenuate pain severity and in addressing interferences to life experiences and mood disturbance through changing cognitive perception of cancer pain.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeaning ascribed to the cancer pain experience by Thai patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160724-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meaning ascribed to the cancer pain experience by Thai patients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Petpichetchian, Wongchan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Prince of Songkla University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Faculty of Nursing, Hat Yai, Songkla, 90110, Thailand</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pwongcha@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is one of the most overwhelming symptoms of cancer and is recognized as a complex multidimensional phenomenon. Western literature suggests that meaning ascribed to pain is one of the cognitive factors influencing pain responses and emotional disturbance. Little research has been conducted with Eastern populations. This study explores the meaning of cancer pain and examines the relationships between perceived meaning and pain responses and emotional disturbance within a conceptual model derived from the Gate Control theory and Lazarus&rsquo;s stress and coping framework. One hundred Thai outpatients who were experiencing cancer-related pain and who voluntarily agreed to participate while visiting the National Cancer Institute and a university hospital comprised the sample. Data were collected using the Brief Pain Inventory, the Profile of Mood States-Short Form, and the Perceived Meaning of Cancer Pain Inventory. Regression analyses revealed that how patients ascribed meaning to their cancer pain influenced subjective pain intensity, pain interference, and mood. Age and gender did not play a role in the pain experience of Thai cancer patients. These findings have implications for nursing practices in planning interventions to attenuate pain severity and in addressing interferences to life experiences and mood disturbance through changing cognitive perception of cancer pain.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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