2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160726
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The stigma of schizophrenia: Presumption of multiple disabilities
Abstract:
The stigma of schizophrenia: Presumption of multiple disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Powell, Jill, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Tennessee-Knoxville
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA
Contact Telephone:865.974.7597
Purpose: Persons with schizophrenia experience stigma in diverse forms, most obviously on the basis of the diagnosis itself. The purpose of this critical qualitative study was to explore stigma as contexualized in the individual's general experience. Theoretical Framework: Marginalization provides the framework for this study. Marginalization occurs when a person is identified as different from the dominant social group and thus pushed to the margins. Once peripherialized, such persons become targets for attribution of other stigmatizing features. Sample: Community-dwelling individuals self-identified as having schiophrenia were interviewed for 2 hours. All participants had experienced some symptoms of schiophrenia in the week prior to interviewing. Methods: Textual data from open-ended interviews were analyzed in four phases: 1) constant comparative analysis 2) narrative analysis 3) Barthesian discourse analysis and 4) correspondence analysis matrices. Results: Participants related that majority persons ascribe to them cognitive and sensory disabilities unrelated to schizophrenia. For example, participants described experience where others assumed they were illiterate because they had a mental illness. Health care providers must be aware not only of the blatant stigma associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but also the subtle and incorrect attribution of other unrelated stigmatizing features.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe stigma of schizophrenia: Presumption of multiple disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160726-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The stigma of schizophrenia: Presumption of multiple disabilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Powell, Jill, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Tennessee-Knoxville</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard, Knoxville, TN, 37996-4180, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">865.974.7597</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jpowell1@utk.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Persons with schizophrenia experience stigma in diverse forms, most obviously on the basis of the diagnosis itself. The purpose of this critical qualitative study was to explore stigma as contexualized in the individual's general experience. Theoretical Framework: Marginalization provides the framework for this study. Marginalization occurs when a person is identified as different from the dominant social group and thus pushed to the margins. Once peripherialized, such persons become targets for attribution of other stigmatizing features. Sample: Community-dwelling individuals self-identified as having schiophrenia were interviewed for 2 hours. All participants had experienced some symptoms of schiophrenia in the week prior to interviewing. Methods: Textual data from open-ended interviews were analyzed in four phases: 1) constant comparative analysis 2) narrative analysis 3) Barthesian discourse analysis and 4) correspondence analysis matrices. Results: Participants related that majority persons ascribe to them cognitive and sensory disabilities unrelated to schizophrenia. For example, participants described experience where others assumed they were illiterate because they had a mental illness. Health care providers must be aware not only of the blatant stigma associated with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, but also the subtle and incorrect attribution of other unrelated stigmatizing features.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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