2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160728
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Against the odds: Breastfeeding experiences of low income women
Abstract:
Against the odds: Breastfeeding experiences of low income women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Raisler, Jeanne
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.763.3218
Purpose: This study asked low income mothers about their experiences of breastfeeding care in the health system and about integrating breastfeeding into their daily lives. Method: Focus group interviews were conducted with nursing mothers enrolled in the WIC Program. Sample: 43 urban and rural women from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Results: Mothers said that helpful breastfeeding care providers knew correct information, established supportive personal relationships, referred women to breastfeeding specialists for problems, showed enthusiasm for nursing and facilitated breastfeeding in concrete ways during the prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum periods. Unhelpful providers missed opportunities to discuss breastfeeding, gave misinformation, encouraged formula supplementation, provided perfunctory breastfeeding care, and were hard to contact when problems arose. Women valued their breastfeeding peer counselors for responding promptly to distress calls, making home visits, being knowledgeable about breastfeeding, providing hands-on assistance, and acting personal and caring. Mothers faced many challenges when incorporating breastfeeding into their daily activities. The physical bond of nursing, modesty , and getting on with daily activities at home, work or school were important issues. Conclusion: Listening to the experiences and opinions of low income women can help health workers to provide more culturally sensitive, effective breastfeeding care and counseling to this population.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAgainst the odds: Breastfeeding experiences of low income womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160728-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Against the odds: Breastfeeding experiences of low income women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Raisler, Jeanne</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.763.3218</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jraisler@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study asked low income mothers about their experiences of breastfeeding care in the health system and about integrating breastfeeding into their daily lives. Method: Focus group interviews were conducted with nursing mothers enrolled in the WIC Program. Sample: 43 urban and rural women from diverse ethnic backgrounds. Results: Mothers said that helpful breastfeeding care providers knew correct information, established supportive personal relationships, referred women to breastfeeding specialists for problems, showed enthusiasm for nursing and facilitated breastfeeding in concrete ways during the prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum periods. Unhelpful providers missed opportunities to discuss breastfeeding, gave misinformation, encouraged formula supplementation, provided perfunctory breastfeeding care, and were hard to contact when problems arose. Women valued their breastfeeding peer counselors for responding promptly to distress calls, making home visits, being knowledgeable about breastfeeding, providing hands-on assistance, and acting personal and caring. Mothers faced many challenges when incorporating breastfeeding into their daily activities. The physical bond of nursing, modesty , and getting on with daily activities at home, work or school were important issues. Conclusion: Listening to the experiences and opinions of low income women can help health workers to provide more culturally sensitive, effective breastfeeding care and counseling to this population.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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