Living to fight another day: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during and after pregnancy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160729
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living to fight another day: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during and after pregnancy
Abstract:
Living to fight another day: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during and after pregnancy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Renker, Paula, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 201-X Mary Gladwin Hall, Akron, OH, 44325-3703, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.5547
Teens that are abused during pregnancy face a myriad of health problems. The purpose of this study was to identify strategies that adolescents use to cope with stress and keep safe from violence before, during, and after pregnancy. An exploratory descriptive design was used that incorporated a qualitative analysis. The sample consisted of 20 non-pregnant teens between the ages of 18 - 20 years who experienced violence before, during, or after a prior pregnancy ending in miscarriage, abortion, or birth. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Manifest content analysis techniques were used to describe types and categories of coping mechanisms. Teens experienced violence from family members, non-intimate acquaintances, and intimate partners. Rape, stalking, physical, and sexual abuse were present in their stories. Teens identified both effective and ineffective coping mechanisms. Teens openly spoke of their distrust of and frustration with health care and criminal justice professionals. Teens were actively engaged in developing creative strategies to minimize the stress and severity of violence in their lives. They also used maladaptive behaviors that further increased their jeopardy. Implications to assist nurses to act proactively to minimize the negative effects of violence were identified.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving to fight another day: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during and after pregnancyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160729-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living to fight another day: Teen strategies for dealing with violence before, during and after pregnancy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renker, Paula, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 201-X Mary Gladwin Hall, Akron, OH, 44325-3703, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.5547</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prenker@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Teens that are abused during pregnancy face a myriad of health problems. The purpose of this study was to identify strategies that adolescents use to cope with stress and keep safe from violence before, during, and after pregnancy. An exploratory descriptive design was used that incorporated a qualitative analysis. The sample consisted of 20 non-pregnant teens between the ages of 18 - 20 years who experienced violence before, during, or after a prior pregnancy ending in miscarriage, abortion, or birth. A semi-structured interview guide was used. Manifest content analysis techniques were used to describe types and categories of coping mechanisms. Teens experienced violence from family members, non-intimate acquaintances, and intimate partners. Rape, stalking, physical, and sexual abuse were present in their stories. Teens identified both effective and ineffective coping mechanisms. Teens openly spoke of their distrust of and frustration with health care and criminal justice professionals. Teens were actively engaged in developing creative strategies to minimize the stress and severity of violence in their lives. They also used maladaptive behaviors that further increased their jeopardy. Implications to assist nurses to act proactively to minimize the negative effects of violence were identified.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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