2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160731
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Parents and teens developing awareness of conflict resolution
Abstract:
Parents and teens developing awareness of conflict resolution
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Riesch, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.263.5169
To describe what parents and young teens think about conflict and conflict resolution in their relationship was the purpose of this pilot study guided by integrative negotiation concepts. The sample included 4 young teens and their parents from a medium-sized school district. Focus groups and content analysis of audio-taped transcripts found that: (a) young teens thought parents or siblings initiated most disagreements and that disagreements were routine, (b) they handled conflict with their parents by trying to prevent it, or if a conflict ensued they used emotion, aggression, the example of older siblings, cooling off, accepting some blame, or submission to resolve it. Parents viewed the disagreements as (a) representing their struggles with their role as parent or (b) opportunities to instill a sense of intrinsic responsibility in their child. Parents used setting clear expectations, parental authority, negotiation, cool down, and feedback strategies to solve disagreements with their young teens. We conclude that parents and young teens do not use a systematic method of solving disagreements. Further, these families were not ready to be handed such a conflict resolution guide as the signs of impending disagreements were not clear to them.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParents and teens developing awareness of conflict resolutionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160731-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Parents and teens developing awareness of conflict resolution</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Riesch, Susan, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.263.5169</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">skriesch@facstaff.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">To describe what parents and young teens think about conflict and conflict resolution in their relationship was the purpose of this pilot study guided by integrative negotiation concepts. The sample included 4 young teens and their parents from a medium-sized school district. Focus groups and content analysis of audio-taped transcripts found that: (a) young teens thought parents or siblings initiated most disagreements and that disagreements were routine, (b) they handled conflict with their parents by trying to prevent it, or if a conflict ensued they used emotion, aggression, the example of older siblings, cooling off, accepting some blame, or submission to resolve it. Parents viewed the disagreements as (a) representing their struggles with their role as parent or (b) opportunities to instill a sense of intrinsic responsibility in their child. Parents used setting clear expectations, parental authority, negotiation, cool down, and feedback strategies to solve disagreements with their young teens. We conclude that parents and young teens do not use a systematic method of solving disagreements. Further, these families were not ready to be handed such a conflict resolution guide as the signs of impending disagreements were not clear to them.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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