2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160732
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies to minimize attrition in a randomized clinical trial
Abstract:
Strategies to minimize attrition in a randomized clinical trial
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Roberts, Beverly, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.2541
Morbidity, mortality, skilled care placement, lack of interest and functional decline contribute to attrition in randomized clinical trials that research hospitalized frail elders. These factors may continue after discharge and lead to attrition and missing data that compromise power and sample size. In a 12-week study of exercise, attrition was unexpectedly high. Among the 41 women and 14 men (M=78 years) in the exercise program, and 40 women and 15 men (M=78 years) in the control group, attrition was 45% and 40%, respectively, despite cash incentives, RN data collectors, mailings, and transportation to the data collection site. Factors related to attrition were identified as controllable (lack of interest-17%), and uncontrollable (rehospitalization-9%, extensive PT-8%, death-4%, lost to follow-up-1%, nursing home placement-1% and relocation-<1%). Weekly telephone calls and in-person contact decreased those lost to controllable factors. Among the subsequent 18 women and 5 men in the exercise group and the 18 women and 6 men in the control group, attrition was reduced to 22% and 13%, respectively, with those lost to lack of interest reduced to less than 1%. Increased communication with subjects between data points is an effective low-cost strategy requiring minimal effort that can decrease attrition in a longitudinal study.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies to minimize attrition in a randomized clinical trialen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160732-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Strategies to minimize attrition in a randomized clinical trial</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Roberts, Beverly, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.2541</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">blr4@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Morbidity, mortality, skilled care placement, lack of interest and functional decline contribute to attrition in randomized clinical trials that research hospitalized frail elders. These factors may continue after discharge and lead to attrition and missing data that compromise power and sample size. In a 12-week study of exercise, attrition was unexpectedly high. Among the 41 women and 14 men (M=78 years) in the exercise program, and 40 women and 15 men (M=78 years) in the control group, attrition was 45% and 40%, respectively, despite cash incentives, RN data collectors, mailings, and transportation to the data collection site. Factors related to attrition were identified as controllable (lack of interest-17%), and uncontrollable (rehospitalization-9%, extensive PT-8%, death-4%, lost to follow-up-1%, nursing home placement-1% and relocation-&lt;1%). Weekly telephone calls and in-person contact decreased those lost to controllable factors. Among the subsequent 18 women and 5 men in the exercise group and the 18 women and 6 men in the control group, attrition was reduced to 22% and 13%, respectively, with those lost to lack of interest reduced to less than 1%. Increased communication with subjects between data points is an effective low-cost strategy requiring minimal effort that can decrease attrition in a longitudinal study.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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