Psycho-endocrine-immune response to mindfulness-based stress reduction in HIV-infected individuals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/160733
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psycho-endocrine-immune response to mindfulness-based stress reduction in HIV-infected individuals
Abstract:
Psycho-endocrine-immune response to mindfulness-based stress reduction in HIV-infected individuals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Robinson, F.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Research Associate
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 405E NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.8217
Stress may hasten HIV disease progression by compromising immune response and increasing viral replication. Conversely, stress reduction may buffer effects of stress on HIV disease. This study determined the effects of an 8-week, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on perceived stress, mood, stress hormones, immune function, and health in HIV infected subjects. A synthesized conceptual framework of psychoneuroimmunology and a transactional model of stress guided the study. A quasi-experimental, repeated-measures, control group design was utilized. Subjects were non-randomly assigned to intervention or control group, and data were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks (immediately post-intervention), and 3 months post-intervention. At 8-weeks the MSBR group showed significant increases (p<0.05; T-test from baseline) in mood, functional health, and natural killer (NK) cell activity due to elevated NK cell numbers. These changes persisted at 3-months post-intervention. Control subjects showed no changes over time. Cortisol and DHEAS did not change in either group. These results provide empirical evidence to include stress reduction techniques in the comprehensive care of patients with HIV disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsycho-endocrine-immune response to mindfulness-based stress reduction in HIV-infected individualsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/160733-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psycho-endocrine-immune response to mindfulness-based stress reduction in HIV-infected individuals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, F.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 405E NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.8217</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prphd@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Stress may hasten HIV disease progression by compromising immune response and increasing viral replication. Conversely, stress reduction may buffer effects of stress on HIV disease. This study determined the effects of an 8-week, mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on perceived stress, mood, stress hormones, immune function, and health in HIV infected subjects. A synthesized conceptual framework of psychoneuroimmunology and a transactional model of stress guided the study. A quasi-experimental, repeated-measures, control group design was utilized. Subjects were non-randomly assigned to intervention or control group, and data were collected at baseline, 4 weeks, 8 weeks (immediately post-intervention), and 3 months post-intervention. At 8-weeks the MSBR group showed significant increases (p&lt;0.05; T-test from baseline) in mood, functional health, and natural killer (NK) cell activity due to elevated NK cell numbers. These changes persisted at 3-months post-intervention. Control subjects showed no changes over time. Cortisol and DHEAS did not change in either group. These results provide empirical evidence to include stress reduction techniques in the comprehensive care of patients with HIV disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:09:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:09:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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